Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

First U.S. Use Of Revolutionary Technique For Spinal Fusion Performed By UB Neurosurgeons

Date:
February 10, 2005
Source:
University At Buffalo
Summary:
Surgeons at the University at Buffalo have carried out the first minimally invasive spinal surgery in the U.S., using a new technique to stabilize the lumbar spine called axial lumbar interbody fusion, or AxiaLIF.

UB neurosurgeons have performed the first minimally invasive spinal surgery in the U.S., using tiny instruments that are threaded to the surgery site.
Credit: Image courtesy of University At Buffalo

Buffalo, N.Y. -- Surgeons at the University at Buffalo have carried out the first minimally invasive spinal surgery in the U.S., using a new technique to stabilize the lumbar spine called axial lumbar interbody fusion, or AxiaLIF ™.

Related Articles


The procedure requires only a tiny incision in the back and can have patients up and walking without pain within hours of leaving the operating theater.

Two hours following surgery, the first U.S. patient to receive the new back surgery said her back and leg pain was totally gone and she was "just a little sore."

"Lumbar spine surgery will never be the same," said a delighted L. Nelson Hopkins, M.D., professor and chair of the UB Department of Neurosurgery, upon hearing of the patient's good results. "This begins a total revolution."

The new technique could be used for 90 percent of all fusion surgeries, Hopkins said.

Elad Levy, M.D., UB associate professor of neurosurgery and radiology, performed the surgery on Jan. 28 at Millard Fillmore Hospital of Kaleida Health on a 31-year-old woman who had long-standing back pain due to an earlier injury. A recent re-injury to her spine had left the patient with debilitating pain in her back and legs, requiring her to take a leave from her bank job and to use a cane to walk.

Levy said the patient was an ideal candidate for the technology's U.S. premiere because she had no arthritis or degeneration of the vertebrae often seen in the mostly older persons who require back surgery.

Typically spinal fusion surgery requires a 5-to-6-inch incision in the back, retraction of the back muscles and tissue in order to gain access to the surgery site, cauterization of blood vessels and generalized trauma to the entire spinal region, said Levy. The patient usually spends several days in the hospital and several months in recovery.

Axial lumbar interbody fusion requires a 2-centimeter incision just to the left of the tailbone, he said. Instruments needed to perform the procedure are threaded internally along the spine to the surgery site by following a guide wire. Miniaturized scrapers remove torn and diseased disk material and tiny drills create the spaces to insert screws that stabilize the spine.

For the right patients, the procedure could be done on an out-patient basis, Levy said.

The technique was developed five years ago by an interventional radiologist who founded a company called Axial Med, now Trans1 Inc. The first trials on cadavers took place at UB's Toshiba Stroke Research Center in 2000.

The first surgeries were performed in Brazil, where 35 patients have been operated on since the technique was introduced there in 2003. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only recently approved the procedure for use in the U.S.

"Dr. Hopkins has developed the premiere model for minimally invasive surgery centers in the U.S., so it's fitting that the first surgery took place in Buffalo," said Rick Randall, president and CEO of Trans1 Inc. "This surgery was the first step in the validation of this unconventional approach to spinal surgery. This is going to be standard practice in the future."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University At Buffalo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University At Buffalo. "First U.S. Use Of Revolutionary Technique For Spinal Fusion Performed By UB Neurosurgeons." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 February 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050205110120.htm>.
University At Buffalo. (2005, February 10). First U.S. Use Of Revolutionary Technique For Spinal Fusion Performed By UB Neurosurgeons. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050205110120.htm
University At Buffalo. "First U.S. Use Of Revolutionary Technique For Spinal Fusion Performed By UB Neurosurgeons." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050205110120.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins