Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Helping Future Engineers Use Today's Design Plans

Date:
February 20, 2005
Source:
National Institute Of Standards And Technology
Summary:
Digital design software has virtually replaced blueprints across all manufacturing sectors. STEP (the Standard for the Exchange of Product Data), a universal format for product data that allows industrial partners with different proprietary software to understand and share engineering data, has accelerated this change. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and PDES, Inc., an industry consortium, have just introduced a new STEP standard that should help ensure that tomorrow's engineers will be able to understand today's complex designs.

Detail of a STEP product assembly diagram.
Credit: Image courtesy of National Institute Of Standards And Technology

Digital design software has virtually replaced blueprints across all manufacturing sectors. STEP (the Standard for the Exchange of Product Data), a universal format for product data that allows industrial partners with different proprietary software to understand and share engineering data, has accelerated this change. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and PDES, Inc., an industry consortium, have just introduced a new STEP standard that should help ensure that tomorrow's engineers will be able to understand today's complex designs.

The new standard allows more sophisticated descriptions of proprietary designs and processes. This should eliminate the need for manufacturers to understand and consult a wide variety of original software programs. The additional descriptive information covering three-dimensional mechanical designs and assemblies also should help engineers to duplicate or repair complex machines such as aircraft, or ships, long after the original design and manufacturing software has been discontinued or changed beyond recognition.

The new STEP standard, called AP203 Edition 2, supports the latest advances in product design. It can be used to express complex three-dimensional mechanical part models and assemblies with features, tolerances, and colors, which may denote, for example, specific types of systems, such as hydraulic and electrical, or other details especially important in manufacturing.

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is expected to publish the new STEP protocol this month for distribution and implementation by software vendors and manufacturers. NIST developed AP203 Edition 2 with private-sector partners, including aerospace, automobile, shipbuilding and computer software corporations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute Of Standards And Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute Of Standards And Technology. "Helping Future Engineers Use Today's Design Plans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 February 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050213133227.htm>.
National Institute Of Standards And Technology. (2005, February 20). Helping Future Engineers Use Today's Design Plans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050213133227.htm
National Institute Of Standards And Technology. "Helping Future Engineers Use Today's Design Plans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050213133227.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services


Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins