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Another Look At An Enigmatic New World

Date:
March 4, 2005
Source:
European Southern Observatory
Summary:
On January 14, 2005, the ESA Huygens probe arrived at Saturn's largest satellite, Titan. After a faultless descent through the dense atmosphere, it touched down on the icy surface of this strange world from where it continued to transmit precious data back to the Earth.

Titan's trailing hemisphere [3] with the Huygens landing site marked as an "X". The left image was taken with NACO and a narrow-band filter centred at 2 microns. On the right is the NACO/SDI image of the same location showing Titan's surface through the 1.6 micron methane window. A spherical projection with coordinates on Titan is overplotted.
Credit: NACO/VLT

On January 14, 2005, the ESA Huygens probe arrived at Saturn's largest satellite, Titan. After a faultless descent through the dense atmosphere, it touched down on the icy surface of this strange world from where it continued to transmit precious data back to the Earth.

Several of the world's large ground-based telescopes were also active during this exciting event, observing Titan before and near the Huygens encounter, within the framework of a dedicated campaign coordinated by the members of the Huygens Project Scientist Team. Indeed, large astronomical telescopes with state-of-the art adaptive optics systems allow scientists to image Titan's disc in quite some detail. Moreover, ground-based observations are not restricted to the limited period of the fly-by of Cassini and landing of Huygens. They hence complement ideally the data gathered by this NASA/ESA mission, further optimising the overall scientific return.

A group of astronomers [1] observed Titan with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) during the nights from 14 to 16 January, by means of the adaptive optics NAOS/CONICA instrument mounted on the 8.2-m Yepun telescope [2]. The observations were carried out in several modes, resulting in a series of fine images and detailed spectra of this mysterious moon. They complement earlier VLT observations of Titan, cf. ESO Press Photos 08/04 and ESO Press Release 09/04.

The new images show Titan's atmosphere and surface at various near-infrared spectral bands. The surface of Titan's trailing side is visible in images taken through narrow-band filters at wavelengths 1.28, 1.6 and 2.0 microns. They correspond to the so-called "methane windows" which allow to peer all the way through the lower Titan atmosphere to the surface. On the other hand, Titan's atmosphere is visible through filters centred in the wings of these methane bands, e.g. at 2.12 and 2.17 microns.

Eric Gendron of the Paris Observatory in France and leader of the team, is extremely pleased: "We believe that some of these images are the highest-contrast images of Titan ever taken with any ground-based or earth-orbiting telescope."

The excellent images of Titan's surface show the location of the Huygens landing site in much detail. In particular, those centred at wavelength 1.6 micron and obtained with the Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI) on NACO [4] provide the highest contrast and best views. This is firstly because the filters match the 1.6 micron methane window most accurately. Secondly, it is possible to get an even clearer view of the surface by subtracting accurately the simultaneously recorded images of the atmospheric haze, taken at wavelength 1.625 micron.

The images show the great complexity of Titan's trailing side, which was earlier thought to be very dark. However, it is now obvious that bright and dark regions cover the field of these images.

The best resolution achieved on the surface features is about 0.039 arcsec, corresponding to 200 km on Titan. ESO PR Photo 04c/04 illustrates the striking agreement between the NACO/SDI image taken with the VLT from the ground and the ISS/Cassini map.

The images of Titan's atmosphere at 2.12 microns show a still-bright south pole with an additional atmospheric bright feature, which may be clouds or some other meteorological phenomena. The astronomers have followed it since 2002 with NACO and notice that it seems to be fading with time. At 2.17 microns, this feature is not visible and the north-south asymmetry - also known as "Titan's smile" - is clearly in favour in the north. The two filters probe different altitude levels and the images thus provide information about the extent and evolution of the north-south asymmetry.

Probing the composition of the surface

Because the astronomers have also obtained spectroscopic data at different wavelengths, they will be able to recover useful information on the surface composition.

The Cassini/VIMS instrument explores Titan's surface in the infrared range and, being so close to this moon, it obtains spectra with a much better spatial resolution than what is possible with Earth-based telescopes. However, with NACO at the VLT, the astronomers have the advantage of observing Titan with considerably higher spectral resolution, and thus to gain more detailed spectral information about the composition, etc. The observations therefore complement each other.

Once the composition of the surface at the location of the Huygens landing is known from the detailed analysis of the in-situ measurements, it should become possible to learn the nature of the surface features elsewhere on Titan by combining the Huygens results with more extended cartography from Cassini as well as from VLT observations to come.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Southern Observatory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European Southern Observatory. "Another Look At An Enigmatic New World." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050224123722.htm>.
European Southern Observatory. (2005, March 4). Another Look At An Enigmatic New World. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050224123722.htm
European Southern Observatory. "Another Look At An Enigmatic New World." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050224123722.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

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