Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Imaging Technologies Can Enhance Orthopaedic Outcomes

Date:
March 13, 2005
Source:
Hospital For Special Surgery
Summary:
New imaging technologies are enabling doctors to not only diagnose a variety of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal conditions with more accuracy, but also to determine with unprecedented precision whether clinical recovery from bone, joint or tendon damage is actually complete and not simply a "placebo effect."

WASHINGTON, D.C. Feb. 24, 2005 -- New imaging technologies are enabling doctors to not only diagnose a variety of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal conditions with more accuracy, but also to determine with unprecedented precision whether clinical recovery from bone, joint or tendon damage is actually complete and not simply a "placebo effect."

Related Articles


Radiologists examining patients with damaged tissue are increasingly using ultrasound and specialized MRI techniques that allow examination with great detail - to provide non-invasive diagnostic tools that replace the need for routine arthroscopic inspection.

"New imaging technology may serve as objective outcome measures for orthopedic conditions, both at initial diagnosis as well as following pharmaceutical or surgical intervention," said Hollis G. Potter, MD, Chief of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

Dr. Potter's remarks were part of a keynote address, "The Future of Orthopaedics: Advancements That Will Affect How Care is Provided," which she presented on Thursday, Feb. 24 at the annual meeting of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in Washington, D.C.

"Doctors treating patients for orthopaedic problems often witness a placebo effect. It's not surprising because people want to feel better, especially when orthopedic problems are hindering their daily activities," said Dr. Potter. "With time and after treatment, patients may feel better, but sometimes the underlying biology for that patient's problem tells a very different story."

Dr. Potter said that observable clinical outcomes such as walking and stair climbing ability are still important measures for patients who have sustained joint or tendon injury, have severe arthritis or undergone joint replacement surgery.

She added that imaging technology "should be held to the same degree of rigor as any clinical outcome instrument, and should be validated with regards to accuracy and reproducibility."

"In osteoarthritis, new imaging techniques permit early disease detection, serve as an objective outcome measure for cartilage repair procedures and also provide a measure by which to assess disease modification with pharmaceutical intervention," Dr. Potter said.

"At the end of the clinical spectrum of osteoarthritis (arthroplasty), new imaging techniques allow for more sensitive and earlier detection of particle disease, with non-invasive and more precise quantification of bone loss, as well as detection of synovial reaction at the origin of the adverse biologic reaction," Dr. Potter said.

The Hospital for Special Surgery offers one of the largest and most experienced team of musculoskeletal radiologists in the world.

###

About HSS

Founded in 1863, the Hospital for Special Surgery is a world leader in orthopedics, rheumatology and rehabilitation. Ranked No. 1 in the Northeast in its specialties by U.S. News and World Report's, HSS was awarded Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. A member of the New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System and an affiliate of Weill Medical College of Cornell University, HSS provides orthopedic and rheumatologic patient care at New York-Presbyterian Hospital at New York Weill Cornell Medical Center. All HSS medical staff members are on the faculty of Weill Medical College of Cornell University. Its Research Institute is internationally recognized as a leader in the investigation of musculoskeletal and autoimmune diseases. The hospital is located in New York City, http://www.hss.edu


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Hospital For Special Surgery. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Hospital For Special Surgery. "New Imaging Technologies Can Enhance Orthopaedic Outcomes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 March 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050225103924.htm>.
Hospital For Special Surgery. (2005, March 13). New Imaging Technologies Can Enhance Orthopaedic Outcomes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050225103924.htm
Hospital For Special Surgery. "New Imaging Technologies Can Enhance Orthopaedic Outcomes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050225103924.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins