Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Medication Errors Continue Even In Highly Computerized Hospital

Date:
May 24, 2005
Source:
JAMA And Archives Journals
Summary:
Errors in drug ordering, dosage and monitoring that may have serious consequences for patients persist in hospitals even after the adoption of computerized medication systems, according to a study in the May 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

CHICAGO -- Errors in drug ordering, dosage and monitoring that may have serious consequences for patients persist in hospitals even after the adoption of computerized medication systems, according to a study in the May 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Related Articles


Several broad-based studies during the past 15 years have demonstrated that injuries resulting from the use of a drug, called adverse drug events (ADEs), account for up to 41 percent of all hospital admissions and more than two billion dollars annually in inpatient costs, according to background information in the article. Many of these studies have also suggested that as much as a quarter of inpatient adverse drug events might be prevented through the use of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and related computerized medication ordering and administrative systems.

Jonathan R. Nebecker, M.S., M.D., of the Veterans Administration Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, and colleagues conducted a daily review of the electronic medical records from a random sample of patients admitted to a VA hospital during a 20-week period in 2000. Because the Veterans Administration Healthcare System is a leader in implementing multiple computerized interventions, including computerized physician order entry, bar code-controlled medication delivery, a complete electronic medical record, automated drug-drug interaction checking and computerized allergy tracking and alerting, the authors suggest that a VA hospital offers an appropriate setting for testing the impact of computer systems on adverse drug events. Pharmacists used standardized criteria to classify adverse drug events.

Among 937 hospital admissions, 483 clinically significant inpatient adverse drug events were identified. An adverse drug event was considered clinically significant when a change in the patient's treatment plan was required. There were 52 adverse drug events per 100 admissions. One quarter of the hospitalizations had at least one adverse drug event. Nine percent of the adverse drug events resulted in serious harm, the other 91 percent were classified as moderate, requiring monitoring, interventions or discontinuation or adjustment of the dose of the problematic drug. The most common error types were failure to provide for expected adverse drug reactions, for example, prescribing potassium with diuretics to avoid a low potassium level (36 percent); failure to start or complete adequate monitoring for common adverse drug reactions (33 percent); and prescription of improper doses (33 percent) or inappropriate medications (seven percent).

The researchers found errors occurred at the following stages of care, 61 percent ordering, 25 percent monitoring, 13 percent administration, one percent dispensing and 0 percent transcription. The authors note that the computer system was successful in eliminating problems reading physicians' orders (transcription), but did not resolve the other problems associated with administering medication, drug selection, dosage and monitoring.

"In conclusion, our study found high rates of clinically important ADEs related to problems in drug selection, dosage, and monitoring in a VA medical center after the adoption of computerized systems that offered minimal decision support for these specific aspects of the medication process," the authors write. "...our findings do imply that purchasers of CPOE systems should not rely on generic CPOE and bar code medication administration systems alone to dramatically reduce ADE rates. Rather, health care organization desirous of preventing ADEs should consider whether candidate computerized medication systems offer decision support functions that address the most troublesome aspects of the medication administration process."

###

(Arch Intern Med. 2005; 165:1111-1116. Available post-embargo at www.archinternmed.com.)

Editor's Note: This study was supported by grants from the Veterans Administration Health Service Research and Development Service, Washington, D.C., the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center and the Salt Lake Informatics, Decision Enhancement, and Surveillance Center, Salt Lake City, and the VA Cooperative Studies Program, Albuquerque, N.M.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA And Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA And Archives Journals. "Medication Errors Continue Even In Highly Computerized Hospital." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 May 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050524101312.htm>.
JAMA And Archives Journals. (2005, May 24). Medication Errors Continue Even In Highly Computerized Hospital. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050524101312.htm
JAMA And Archives Journals. "Medication Errors Continue Even In Highly Computerized Hospital." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050524101312.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins