Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Doctors Able To Predict Potential Ovarian Failure After Radiation

Date:
July 5, 2005
Source:
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
Summary:
Doctors in the United Kingdom have created a table to predict when a woman who has undergone radiation therapy as a part of cancer treatment regimen in her abdominal or pelvic area may become sterile, according to a new study published in the July 2005 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

Doctors in the United Kingdom have created a table to predict when a woman who has undergone radiation therapy as a part of cancer treatment regimen in her abdominal or pelvic area may become sterile, according to a new study published in the July 2005 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

Radiation therapy to the abdominal and pelvic regions in children and adolescents may potentially expose the ovaries to radiation and cause premature ovarian failure. Though their window of opportunity to become pregnant may be smaller, receiving radiation therapy does not preclude them from natural conception and a successful pregnancy. The researchers developed a formula that takes into account the age of the patient at the time of treatment, the number of premature eggs present at the time of treatment and the dose of radiation received to determine a window of fertility and at what age the woman may experience ovarian failure.

With the help of modern three-dimensional radiation therapy planning, clinicians are able to determine how much radiation the ovaries are exposed to and using the method they developed, the doctors would be able to determine a window of roughly 7.6 years for when a woman could expect to become infertile. The exact window of opportunity will vary from patient to patient.

"Our research has made it possible for doctors to predict when a young woman who has been successfully treated for cancer will develop ovarian failure," said Hamish Wallace, M.D., lead author of the study and Senior Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh and a children's cancer specialist at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh, Scotland. "This will allow doctors to treat them with hormone replacement therapy and prevent osteoporosis and other disabling symptoms of the menopause. This knowledge will also guide patients and doctors to their future window of opportunity to have a baby. For those young women who are at risk of a very early menopause, it is now possible to counsel them of the options currently available to preserve their fertility before their treatment starts."

"We acknowledge this is a predictive model based on pre-clinical work and does not take into account the current use of combined modality treatments in pediatric and adolescent cancer survivors," said Frank Saran, M.D., co-author of the study and Consultant Clinical Oncologist and Honorary Senior Lecturer at Royal Marsden NHS Trust Foundation in Sutton, United Kingdom. "We hope this enables doctors to confidently counsel women on their reproductive potential following the successful treatment of their cancer."

"This information can be used either to vary the treatment -- so that less radiation is received by the ovary -- or possibly commence freezing of ovarian tissue, which is a new technique that potentially enables fertility after serious damage to the ovaries," said Tom W. Kelsey, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D., co-author of the study and a computer scientist at University of St. Andrews in Scotland. "Our results are exciting and useful, and further data is needed to improve the accuracy of our methods."

###

For more information on radiation therapy for gynecologic cancer, please visit www.astro.org/patient/treatment_information/ for a free brochure.

ASTRO is the largest radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 8,000 members who specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As a leading organization in radiation oncology, biology and physics, the Society is dedicated to the advancement of the practice of radiation oncology by promoting excellence in patient care, providing opportunities for educational and professional development, promoting research and disseminating research results and representing radiation oncology in a rapidly evolving socioeconomic healthcare environment.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. "Doctors Able To Predict Potential Ovarian Failure After Radiation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 July 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050705010828.htm>.
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. (2005, July 5). Doctors Able To Predict Potential Ovarian Failure After Radiation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050705010828.htm
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. "Doctors Able To Predict Potential Ovarian Failure After Radiation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050705010828.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) Here are three things you need to know about the deadly Ebola outbreak's progression this week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 28, 2014) The World Health Organisation has called for the regulation of electronic cigarettes as both tobacco and medical products. Ciara Lee looks at the impact of the move on the tobacco industry. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) CDC director Tom Frieden says the Ebola outbreak is even worse than he feared. But he also said there's still hope to contain it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins