Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Blood Flow To Brain May Be Clue To Certain Dementias

Date:
August 30, 2005
Source:
Radiological Society of North America
Summary:
The amount of blood flowing into the brain may play a larger role in the development of dementia than previously believed, according to a study in the September issue of the journal Radiology.

OAK BROOK, Ill.--The amount of blood flowing into the brain may play alarger role in the development of dementia than previously believed,according to a study in the September issue of the journal Radiology.

Researchers from Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlandsused magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the brains of elderlypatients with and without dementia related to Alzheimer's orParkinson's disease. As expected, MR images showed that the patientswith late-onset dementia had more brain damage compared with youngadults and with seniors who had optimal cognitive function. Butresearchers found that the late-onset dementia group also had a muchlower rate of blood flow to the brain than the other two groups.

"Our findings not only support the hypothesis that vascularfactors contribute to dementia in the elderly, they are highlysuggestive that a diminished cerebral blood flow indeed causes braindamage," said Aart Spilt, M.D., a Leiden radiology resident and leadauthor of the study. "This gives us a clue to the genesis of dementia."

Dementia is a loss of cognitive functions, such as thinking,remembering and reasoning, that interferes with normal activities.Although many conditions can produce these symptoms, Alzheimer'sdisease is the most common cause of dementia. Some patients withParkinson's disease also develop dementia.

In the Dutch study, researchers examined 17 patients withlate-onset dementia (dementia occurring after age 75), another 16seniors of the same age with optimal cognitive function and 15 healthyyounger individuals. Researchers used MRI to measure cerebral bloodflow and the extent of structural brain damage in each person and thencompared the results of the three groups.

Average total cerebral blood flow in the healthy youngindividuals was 742 milliliters (mL) per minute. Cerebral blood flow inthe two elderly groups averaged 496 mL per minute, or 246 mL per minutelower than the younger group. In patients with dementia, averagecerebral blood flow was 443 mL per minute, or 108 mL per minute lowerthan seniors of the same age with optimal cognitive function (551 mLper minute).

Although patients with dementia have been shown to requireless cerebral blood flow as the brain becomes less active, Dr. Spilt'sresearch provides some evidence that the decreased blood flow may leadto some types of dementia.

"The findings emphasize the importance of monitoring both highand low blood pressure in older adults," Dr. Spilt said. "Possiblecauses of low cerebral blood flow include heart failure and a narrowingof cerebral or cervical arteries."

###

Radiology is a monthly scientific journal devoted to clinicalradiology and allied sciences. The journal is edited by Anthony V.Proto, M.D., School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University,Richmond, Va. Radiology is owned and published by the RadiologicalSociety of North America, Inc. (RSNA.org/radiologyjnl)

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) is anassociation of more than 37,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists,medical physicists and related scientists committed to promotingexcellence in radiology through education and by fostering research,with the ultimate goal of improving patient care. The Society is basedin Oak Brook, Ill. (RSNA.org)

"Late-Onset Dementia: Structural Brain Damage and Total CerebralBlood Flow." Annelies W.E. Weverling-Rijnsburger, M.D., Huub A.M.Middelkoop, Ph.D., Wiesje M. van der Flier, Ph.D., Jacobijn Gussekloo,M.D., Anton J.M. de Craen, Ph.D., Eduard L.E.M. Bollen, M.D., Gerard J.Blauw, M.D., Mark A. van Buchem, M.D., and Rudi G.J. Westendorp, M.D.,collaborated with Dr. Spilt on this paper.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Radiological Society of North America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Radiological Society of North America. "Blood Flow To Brain May Be Clue To Certain Dementias." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050830070054.htm>.
Radiological Society of North America. (2005, August 30). Blood Flow To Brain May Be Clue To Certain Dementias. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050830070054.htm
Radiological Society of North America. "Blood Flow To Brain May Be Clue To Certain Dementias." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050830070054.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

Newsy (July 29, 2014) If you've been looking for love online, there's a chance somebody has been looking at how you're looking. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

Newsy (July 29, 2014) Researchers have found certain facial features can make us seem more attractive or trustworthy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

Newsy (July 25, 2014) An online quiz from a required course at Ohio State is making waves for suggesting atheists are inherently smarter than Christians. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins