Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Identifies Risk Factors For Multiple Melanoma Skin Cancer

Date:
October 5, 2005
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Patients with a family history of multiple melanoma skin cancer are at increased risk of multiple primary melanomas, according to a study in the October 5 issue of JAMA.

Patients with a family history of multiple melanoma skin cancer are atincreased risk of multiple primary melanomas, according to a study inthe October 5 issue of JAMA.

In 2005, there will be an estimated 62,000 new cases of invasivemelanoma and an estimated 7,600 deaths due to melanoma in the UnitedStates, according to background information in the article. Melanoma isthe fifth leading cancer in men and the sixth leading cancer in womenin the United States. The incidence of melanoma continues to rise atabout 3 percent per year in the United States, with an estimatedlifetime risk for an individual of 1.4 percent. This increasingincidence puts a larger portion of the population at risk not only forone primary melanoma but also for subsequent primary melanomas.

Cristina R. Ferrone, M.D., and colleagues from Memorial Sloan-KetteringCancer Center, New York, conducted a study to identify the incidenceand characteristics of patients at risk of developing multiple primarymelanomas (MPM). The study included 4,484 patients diagnosed with afirst primary melanoma between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2002.

The researchers found that 385 patients (8.6 percent) had 2 or moreprimary melanomas, with an average of 2.3 melanomas per MPM patient.Seventy-eight percent had 2 primary melanomas. For 74 percent ofpatients, the initial melanoma was the thickest tumor. Fifty-ninepercent presented with their second primary tumor within 1 year.Twenty-one percent of MPM patients had a positive family history ofmelanoma compared with only 12 percent of patients with a singleprimary melanoma (SPM). Thirty-eight percent of MPM patients haddysplastic nevi (DN; atypical moles) compared with 18 percent of SPMpatients.

The estimated cumulative 5-year risk of a second primary tumor for theentire cohort was 11.4 percent, with almost half of that risk occurringwithin the first year. For patients with a positive family history ordysplastic nevi, the estimated 5-year risk of MPM was significantlyhigher at 19.1 percent and 23.7 percent, respectively. The moststriking increase in incidence for the MPM population was seen fordevelopment of a third primary melanoma from the time of second primarymelanoma, which was 15.6 percent at 1 year and 30.9 percent at 5 years.

"Patients with a positive family history or a history of DN are atsignificantly greater risk of developing MPM and should be enrolled inmore intensive dermatologic surveillance programs. This high-risksubset of patients should also be further characterized genetically tofurther elucidate the biology and etiology of melanoma," the authorsconclude.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Study Identifies Risk Factors For Multiple Melanoma Skin Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 October 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051005075345.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2005, October 5). Study Identifies Risk Factors For Multiple Melanoma Skin Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051005075345.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Study Identifies Risk Factors For Multiple Melanoma Skin Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051005075345.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins