Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NASA Makes A Heated 3-D Look Into Hurricane Erin's Eye

Date:
October 11, 2005
Source:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Summary:
Hurricane Erin raced across the North Atlantic and along the eastern seaboard in September 2001. She was used as an experiment for a study to improve hurricane tracking and intensity predictions, allowing meteorologists to provide more accurate and timely warnings to the public. Studies show that temperatures measured at an extremely high altitude collected from a hurricane's center or eye can provide improved understanding of how hurricanes change intensity.

This 3D rendition of hurricane Erin shows elements of the hurricane engine inside the clouds (white): Rainfall (green), as revealed by TRMM, and warmth of the upper level eye (red), as revealed by the dropsondes released from the NASA ER-2 aircraft.
Credit: NASA

HurricaneErin was analyzed during the fourth Convection And Moisture EXperiment(CAMEX-4), which took place from August 16 through September 24, 2001.The mission originated from the Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Fla.The mission united researchers from 10 universities, five NASA centersand the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. CAMEX-4 is aseries of field research investigations to study tropical cyclones —storms commonly known as hurricanes.

Twenty instrumentedpackages, called dropsondes, were dropped into Erin's eye by two NASAresearch aircraft (the ER-2 and DC-8). The special packages includedinstruments that mapped temperature patterns.

For the first time,researchers were able to reconstruct the structure of the eye in threedimensions from as high as 70,000 feet, down to the ocean surface, ingreat detail. The dropsondes showed Erin's warm core decreasing whileit was rapidly weakening, making the storm more vulnerable to windshear, a change in horizontal winds, which led to the storm fallingapart.

Hurricane Erin's rainfall pattern adjusted quickly tosurprisingly small changes in wind speed patterns in the surroundingatmosphere. Weak horizontal winds rearrange rain and wind structure,which create uneven weather conditions around the hurricane's core.

Observationsfrom the study show the relationship between warm air from the eye ofthe storm is linked to reduction in sea surface pressure, which is thebasic process that drives the hurricane's destructive winds.

Althoughlittle is known about the birth of a hurricane and what causes it tostrengthen or weaken, scientists have made substantial steps towardimproving predictions of where a hurricane will move or make landfall.The ability to forecast intensity change, however, has always been achallenge for meteorologists.

The research done on Hurricane Erinwas important because it could help forecasters understand factors thatcontrol rain intensity and distribution for hurricanes landing alongthe Eastern Seaboard.

Freshwater flooding is the number onekiller from hurricanes in the Western Hemisphere and the study of ahurricane's rainfall pattern could better prepare us for the next bigstorm.

This research paper, titled "Warm Core Structure ofHurricane Erin Diagnosed from High Altitude Dropsondes During CAMEX-4"by J. Halverson et al., is going to be published in an upcoming issueof the American Meteorological Society's Journal of AtmosphericScience, CAMEX Special Issue, at the end of 2005.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "NASA Makes A Heated 3-D Look Into Hurricane Erin's Eye." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 October 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051007090048.htm>.
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. (2005, October 11). NASA Makes A Heated 3-D Look Into Hurricane Erin's Eye. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051007090048.htm
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "NASA Makes A Heated 3-D Look Into Hurricane Erin's Eye." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051007090048.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

AP (July 30, 2014) British officials said on Wednesday that driverless cars will be tested on roads in as many as three cities in a trial program set to begin in January. Officials said the tests will last up to three years. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
China's Drone King Says the Revolution Depends on Regulators

China's Drone King Says the Revolution Depends on Regulators

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Comparing his current crop of drones to early personal computers, DJI founder Frank Wang says the industry is poised for a growth surge - assuming regulators in more markets clear it for takeoff. Jon Gordon reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
3Doodler Bring 3-D Printing to Your Hand

3Doodler Bring 3-D Printing to Your Hand

AP (July 30, 2014) 3-D printing is a cool technology, but it's not exactly a hands-on way to make things. Enter the 3Doodler: the pen that turns you into the 3-D printer. AP technology writer Peter Svensson takes a closer look. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Climate Change Could Cost Billions, According To White House

Climate Change Could Cost Billions, According To White House

Newsy (July 29, 2014) A report from the White House warns not curbing greenhouse gas emissions could cost the U.S. billions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins