Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Patients Regain Cognitive Function After Radiation For Brain Tumors

Date:
November 27, 2005
Source:
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
Summary:
Patients who suffer from low-grade brain tumors are able to regain normal cognitive function after receiving radiation therapy to shrink their tumor, according to a study published in the November 15, 2005, issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

Patients who suffer from low-grade brain tumors are able to regain normal cognitive function after receiving radiation therapy to shrink their tumor, according to a study published in the November 15, 2005, issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

Prior to undergoing radiation therapy to treat their brain tumor, the 20 patients studied were submitted to a battery of intensive cognitive tests measuring intelligence, memory, learning and attention span to establish a baseline score to compare to future results. Following radiation therapy, patients were re-evaluated at 18-month intervals over the next five years. While the baseline test results were considered below average compared to age-specific norms, the first test after receiving radiation showed an increase in the group's overall score.

"These results suggest that the patients with brain tumors perform below average on these tests before radiation therapy because the tumor itself affects their cognitive skills," said Paul D. Brown, M.D., co-author of the study and a radiation oncologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "After the radiation, the brain function of the patients in the study went back to their normal, pre-tumor levels and stayed there for five years. This shows that a moderate dose of radiation, using modern techniques, does not cause cognitive injury in brain tumor patients."

Of the 20 patients, only one patient reverted back to their baseline scores three years after radiation therapy and across the board improvement was noted in immediate verbal memory, learning, long-term verbal memory, cognitive flexibility and spatial problem solving.

"Average life expectancy for these patients is three to 10 years and because there are no curative treatments for this type of cancer, a high priority is given to maintaining cognitive function and hence quality of life for as long as possible," said Brown. "This study shows that we can maintain and even improve the quality of life for someone suffering from a brain tumor."

###

For more information on radiation therapy for brain tumors, please visit www.rtanswers.org.

ASTRO is the largest radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 8,000 members who specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As a leading organization in radiation oncology, biology and physics, the Society is dedicated to the advancement of the practice of radiation oncology by promoting excellence in patient care, providing opportunities for educational and professional development, promoting research and disseminating research results and representing radiation oncology in a rapidly evolving socioeconomic healthcare environment.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. "Patients Regain Cognitive Function After Radiation For Brain Tumors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 November 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051126140800.htm>.
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. (2005, November 27). Patients Regain Cognitive Function After Radiation For Brain Tumors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051126140800.htm
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. "Patients Regain Cognitive Function After Radiation For Brain Tumors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051126140800.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) Twenty college-age students are getting 100,000 dollars from a Silicon Valley leader and a chance to live in San Francisco in order to work on the start-up project of their dreams, but they have to quit school first. Duration: 02:20 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) A new study suggests babies develop language skills more quickly if their parents imitate the babies' sounds and expressions and talk to them often. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins