Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Men With Erectile Dysfunction Have Increased Risk For Cardiovascular Events

Date:
December 21, 2005
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Men with erectile dysfunction have a higher risk of subsequent cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, and angina, according to a study in the December 21 issue of JAMA.

Men with erectile dysfunction have a higher risk of subsequent cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, and angina, according to a study in the December 21 issue of JAMA.

More than 10 million men in the United States are affected by erectile dysfunction (ED), with an estimated 100 million men affected worldwide, according to background information in the article. The risk of erectile dysfunction is related to many factors, including age, smoking, diabetes, heart disease, depression, and hypertension. Because cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction share etiologies as well as pathophysiology (endothelial dysfunction) and because of evidence that degree of erectile dysfunction correlates with severity of cardiovascular disease, it has been postulated that erectile dysfunction is a sentinel symptom in patients with cardiovascular disease.

Ian M. Thompson, M.D., of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and colleagues studied a group of men who were assessed for ED and subsequent cardiovascular disease over the course of 7 years. The study included men aged 55 years or older who were randomized to the placebo group (n = 9,457) in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial at 221 U.S. centers. Participants were evaluated every 3 months for cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction between 1994 and 2003. In analysis, factors at study entry taken into account included age, body mass index, blood pressure, serum lipids, diabetes, family history of heart attack, race, smoking history, current use of antihypertensive medication, physical activity, and quality of life.

Of the 9,457 men randomized to placebo, 8,063 (85 percent) had no cardiovascular disease at study entry; of these men, 3,816 (47 percent) had erectile dysfunction at study entry. Among the 4,247 men without erectile dysfunction at study entry, 2,420 men (57 percent) reported incident erectile dysfunction after 5 years. After adjustment, incident erectile dysfunction was associated with a 25 percent increased risk for subsequent cardiovascular events during study follow-up. For men with either incident or prevalent erectile dysfunction, the increased risk was 45 percent.

"Our analysis of men in the placebo group of this study demonstrates the substantial association between incident as well as prevalent erectile dysfunction and subsequent cardiovascular disease, including angina, myocardial infarction, stroke, and transient ischemic attack," the authors write.

"The implications of this study are substantial. With the availability of effective pharmacotherapy, an increasing number of men are seeking care for erectile dysfunction. It is estimated that more than 600,000 men aged 40 to 69 years in the United States develop erectile dysfunction annually. Our data suggest that the older men in this group have about a 2-fold greater risk of cardiovascular disease than [younger] men without erectile dysfunction. With 70 percent to 89 percent of sudden cardiac deaths occurring in men and with many men not having regular physical examinations, this analysis suggests that the initial presentation of a man with erectile dysfunction should prompt the evaluating physician to screen for standard cardiovascular risk factors and, as appropriate, initiate cardioprotective interventions," they write.

"Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a strong association between erectile dysfunction and subsequent development of clinical cardiovascular events. Acknowledging this association over a 5-year period and the high prevalence of vasculogenic/atherogenic etiologies in men of this age, the presenting symptom of erectile dysfunction should prompt an assessment of cardiovascular risk factors and vigorous interventions as appropriate. While a full cardiovascular evaluation is not necessary in response to findings of erectile dysfunction in asymptomatic patients, such findings should prompt diligent observation of at-risk men and reinforces the need for intervention for cardiovascular risk factors," the researchers conclude.

###

(JAMA.2005; 294:2996-3002. Available pre-embargo to the media at www.jamamedia.org) Editor's Note: This study was supported in part by Public Health Service grants from the National Cancer Institute.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Men With Erectile Dysfunction Have Increased Risk For Cardiovascular Events." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 December 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051221202914.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2005, December 21). Men With Erectile Dysfunction Have Increased Risk For Cardiovascular Events. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051221202914.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Men With Erectile Dysfunction Have Increased Risk For Cardiovascular Events." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051221202914.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Aimed at reducing sexual assaults on college campuses, California has adopted a new law changing the standard of consent for sexual activity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Researchers looked at 1,500 blood samples and determined people who developed pancreatic cancer had more branched chain amino acids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins