Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Smoking To Blame For More Than Half Of Difference In Men's Mortality Risk Across Class Lines

Date:
July 14, 2006
Source:
University of Toronto
Summary:
The direct correlation between lower socioeconomic status and mortality risk is well known, but a new study by the University of Toronto and the University of Oxford is the first to determine that more than half the difference in risk of death between men in the highest social strata and those in the lowest can be attributed to smoking.

The direct correlation between lower socioeconomic status and mortality risk is well known, but a new study by the University of Toronto and the University of Oxford is the first to determine that more than half the difference in risk of death between men in the highest social strata and those in the lowest can be attributed to smoking.

The study, which appears online in the Lancet's July 15 issue, looked at nearly 600,000 deaths in men aged 35 to 69 years in the U.K., Canada, U.S. and Poland.

"Across two continents, we find that smoking-related diseases account for well over half of the big difference in death rates between rich and poor," says study co-author Richard Peto, professor of medical statistics and epidemiology at the University of Oxford.

Researchers used an innovative, indirect method to estimate the contribution of smoking to mortality risk. The lung cancer deaths occurring in the different study groups were used as a guide to the respective proportions of deaths attributable to smoking in each group. Results were consistent across the five national populations studied.

Although mortality from smoking has recently started to decrease among men in Europe and North America, during the present decade smoking still accounts for about one-quarter of all male deaths in middle age. The study offers particular clarity to global and public health policy makers concerned with addressing the higher mortality rate among socially disadvantaged groups.

"These findings emphasize the importance of getting more smokers, especially in the lower socioeconomic bracket, to quit," says study co-author Professor Prabhat Jha of U of T's department of public health sciences, director of the Centre for Global Health Research at U of T and St. Michael's Hospital and Canada Research Chair in health and development.

"This means widespread cessation of smoking would do more than anything else to narrow the inequalities in health between rich and poor," says Jha.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Toronto. "Smoking To Blame For More Than Half Of Difference In Men's Mortality Risk Across Class Lines." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 July 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060714082827.htm>.
University of Toronto. (2006, July 14). Smoking To Blame For More Than Half Of Difference In Men's Mortality Risk Across Class Lines. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060714082827.htm
University of Toronto. "Smoking To Blame For More Than Half Of Difference In Men's Mortality Risk Across Class Lines." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060714082827.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) — A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) — That little voice telling you to exercise, get in shape and get healthy is probably coming from your boss. More companies are beefing up wellness programs to try and cut down their health care costs. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) — Scientists say for the extremely elderly, their stem cells might reach a state of exhaustion. This could limit one's life span. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) — The Food and Drug Administration wants to crack down on the use of e-cigarettes, banning the sale of the product to minors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins