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Friendly Bacteria In Alcoholic Milkshake Could Fight Food Allergies

Date:
October 16, 2006
Source:
Society of Chemical Industry
Summary:
"Friendly" bacteria in kefir, a traditionally fermented milk drink, could protect against allergic responses. The drink inhibits the allergen specific antibody Immunoglobulin E (IgE) which can stimulate allergic responses, such as inflammation and constriction of airways. Kefir is easily digested, and ideal for weaning babies. This could be especially significant, as infants under the age of three are most susceptible to food allergies. Currently, there is no effective treatment availiable for food allergy.

Feeding babies alcoholic milk may help to protect against some food allergies. Kefir, a traditional fermented drink, is consumed in Eastern Europe as a health food, and is often used to wean babies, as it is easily digested. Food allergy prevalence is especially high in children under the age of three, with around 5-8% of infants at risk. Currently the only treatment is avoidance of the problematic food.

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"Friendly" bacteria in kefir may play a role in blocking the pathway involved in allergic responses, Lisa Richards reports in Chemistry & Industry, SCI's fortnightly magazine. Research published recently [Monday 16 October 2006(DOI 10.1002/jsfa2469)] in the SCI's Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture has shown that the milk drink inhibits the allergen specific antibody Immunoglobulin E (IgE). IgE is involved in immune responses to inactivate organisms that might cause disease. However, in the presence of allergens it can also activate cells responsible for the release of histamine, a chemical which stimulates allergic responses, such as inflammation and constriction of airways.

Ji-Ruei Liu's team of scientists at the National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan, fed mice the milky drink, and found that after 3 weeks, the amount of ovalbumin (OVA) specific IgE was reduced three-fold. Ovalbumin is an allergenic protein found in egg whites, which cause most allergies in young children. Kefir is also reported to prevent food antigens from passing through the intestinal wall.

Liu believes that the milky drink could be a promising tool in the prevention of allergies. "In the future, maybe we can screen out the certain components (bacterial strains or bioactive peptides) from kefir and utilize them in medicine," he said.

Also in this weeks Chemistry & Industry, UK firm Rigest are looking for backers to develop an air sanitizing system using an enzyme found naturally in human tears. Lactoperoxidase can attack and kill microbes such as 'flu viruses and the bacteria responsible for MRSA. The system could be used to sanitize the air in airplanes and hospital sick bays.

About Chemistry & Industry

Chemistry & Industry magazine from SCI delivers news and comment from the interface between science and business. As well as covering industry and science, it focuses on developments that will be of significant commercial interest in five- to ten-years time. Published twice-monthly and free to SCI Members, it also carries authoritative features and reviews. Opinion-formers worldwide respect Chemistry & Industry for its independent insight.

About the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture

The Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (JSFA) publishes peer-reviewed original research and critical reviews in these areas, with particular emphasis on interdisciplinary studies at the agriculture/food interface. This international journal covers fundamental and applied research.

JSFA is an SCI journal, published by John Wiley & Sons, on behalf of the Society of Chemical Industry, and is available in print (ISSN: 0022-5142) and online (ISSN: 1097-0010) via Wiley InterScience http://www.interscience.wiley.com For further information about the journal go to http://interscience.wiley.com/jsfa


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society of Chemical Industry. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society of Chemical Industry. "Friendly Bacteria In Alcoholic Milkshake Could Fight Food Allergies." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061015213714.htm>.
Society of Chemical Industry. (2006, October 16). Friendly Bacteria In Alcoholic Milkshake Could Fight Food Allergies. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061015213714.htm
Society of Chemical Industry. "Friendly Bacteria In Alcoholic Milkshake Could Fight Food Allergies." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061015213714.htm (accessed January 29, 2015).

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