Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Prostate Cancer Less Likely To Spread When Treated With Higher Dose Of Radiation

Date:
November 15, 2006
Source:
Fox Chase Cancer Center
Summary:
New research suggests that men with prostate cancer who choose radiation therapy should seek treatment centers that will offer high-dose radiation. A new study from Fox Chase Cancer Center finds that higher doses of radiation greatly reduces the risk that the cancer will spread later -- even eight to 10 years after treatment.

New research suggests that men with prostate cancer who choose radiation therapy should seek treatment centers that will offer high-dose radiation. A new study from Fox Chase Cancer Center finds that higher doses of 74 to 82 Gray (Gy) greatly reduce the risk that the cancer will spread later--even 8-10 years after treatment. The results of the study were presented today at the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology in Philadelphia.

Related Articles


"There is a comprehensive body of evidence demonstrating that prostate cancer treated with higher doses of radiation is less likely to grow back in the prostate or cause a rising PSA, and now, we know it is also less likely to spread later to other parts of the body," explained Peter Morgan, M.D., a resident in the Radiation Oncology Department at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

Generally, treatment centers that offer 3D conformal radiation therapy or a newer system of radiation delivery called IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) treat men with the higher levels of radiation shown in this study to prevent the cancer's spread.

Morgan said that no published data from prospective randomized trials have shown a significant reduction in distant metastasis with higher radiation dose, likely because patients have not been followed for long enough to see the reduced of late-wave of metastasis. The current study shows that the risk of cancer spreading 8-10 years after treatment is lower when doses >74 Gray of radiation are given.

When asked how more radiation to the prostate protects the rest of the body from the cancer, Dr. Morgan replied, "That's what is so important about this work. We believe that the late wave of distant metastasis is due to the persistence of cancer in the prostate itself, which subsequently seeds tumor cells to other parts of the body. Because higher dose radiation more effectively kills cancer in the prostate, the source for future metastases is eliminated."

From 1989 to 1999, 667 men with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer were treated consecutively with 3D conformal radiation therapy. The outcomes of men who received less than 74 Gy, 74-75.9 Gy and greater than 76 Gy were compared. These groups had a median follow-up of 84, 84 and 65 months, respectively. The 10-year rate of the cancer spreading outside of the prostate (distant metastasis) was 16 percent for radiation doses less than 74 Gy, 7 percent for 74-75.9 Gy, and 3 percent for greater than 76 Gy.

Morgan said, "At our institution the policy for several years has been to treat prostate cancer to a dose of 76 to 80 Gy using IMRT. This study confirms that we are doing the right thing."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Fox Chase Cancer Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Fox Chase Cancer Center. "Prostate Cancer Less Likely To Spread When Treated With Higher Dose Of Radiation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 November 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061106111911.htm>.
Fox Chase Cancer Center. (2006, November 15). Prostate Cancer Less Likely To Spread When Treated With Higher Dose Of Radiation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061106111911.htm
Fox Chase Cancer Center. "Prostate Cancer Less Likely To Spread When Treated With Higher Dose Of Radiation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061106111911.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Following the closure of schools and universities in Guinea because of the Ebola virus, students look for temporary work or gather in makeshift classrooms to catch up on their syllabus. Duration: 02:14 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN Says It Will Scale Up Its Ebola Response

UN Says It Will Scale Up Its Ebola Response

AFP (Nov. 20, 2014) UN Resident Coordinator David McLachlan-Karr and WHO representative in the country Daniel Kertesz updated the media on the UN Ebola response on Wednesday. Duration: 00:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Takata Offers "sincerest Condolences" To Victims of Malfunctioning Airbag

Takata Offers "sincerest Condolences" To Victims of Malfunctioning Airbag

Reuters - US Online Video (Nov. 20, 2014) U.S. Congress hears from a victim and company officials as it holds a hearing on the safety of Takata airbags after reports of injuries. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins