Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Air Guitarists Rejoice: Engineers Design Wearable Instrument Shirt

Date:
November 13, 2006
Source:
CSIRO Australia
Summary:
CSIRO has "built" a shirt which could fulfill the fantasy of anyone who has, in the privacy of their homes, jammed along with one of rock 'n roll's great lead guitarists. Led by engineer Dr Richard Helmer a team of researchers at CSIRO Textiles and Fibre Technology in Geelong has created a 'wearable instrument shirt' (WIS) which enables users to play an 'air guitar' simply by moving one arm to pick chords and the other to strum the imaginary instrument's strings.

Led by engineer Dr Richard Helmer a team of researchers at CSIRO Textiles and Fibre Technology in Geelong has created a 'wearable instrument shirt' (WIS) which enables users to play an 'air guitar' simply by moving one arm to pick chords and the other to strum the imaginary instrument's strings.
Credit: Image courtesy of CSIRO Australia

Australia's scientific research agency, CSIRO has 'built' a shirt which could fulfil the fantasy of anyone who has, in the privacy of their homes, jammed along with one of rock 'n roll's great lead guitarists.

Led by engineer Dr Richard Helmer a team of researchers at CSIRO Textiles and Fibre Technology in Geelong has created a 'wearable instrument shirt' (WIS) which enables users to play an 'air guitar' simply by moving one arm to pick chords and the other to strum the imaginary instrument's strings.

"Freedom of movement is a great feature of these textile-based interfaces," Dr Helmer says.

"Our air guitar consists of a wearable sensor interface embedded in a conventional 'shirt' which uses custom software to map gestures with audio samples.

"It's an easy-to-use, virtual instrument that allows real-time music making -- even by players without significant musical or computing skills. It allows you to jump around and the sound generated is just like an original mp3."

The WIS works by recognising and interpreting arm movements and relaying this wirelessly to a computer for audio generation. There are no trailing cables to get in the way or trip over.

Textile motion sensors embedded in the shirt sleeves detect motion when the arm bends -- in most cases the left arm chooses a note and the right arm plays it.

By customising the software, the team has also tailored the technology to make an air tambourine and an air guiro (percussion instrument).

Dr Helmer says the development of the WIS required intensive collaboration by researchers with high-level skills in computing, chemistry, electronics, music composition and textile manufacture.

"The technology -- which is adaptable to almost any kind of apparel -- takes clothing beyond its traditional role of protection and fashion into the realms of entertainment and a wide range of other applications including the development of clothes which will be able to monitor physiological changes," he says.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by CSIRO Australia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

CSIRO Australia. "Air Guitarists Rejoice: Engineers Design Wearable Instrument Shirt." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 November 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061113170750.htm>.
CSIRO Australia. (2006, November 13). Air Guitarists Rejoice: Engineers Design Wearable Instrument Shirt. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061113170750.htm
CSIRO Australia. "Air Guitarists Rejoice: Engineers Design Wearable Instrument Shirt." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061113170750.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

German Researchers Crack Samsung's Fingerprint Scanner

German Researchers Crack Samsung's Fingerprint Scanner

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) German researchers have used a fake fingerprint made from glue to bypass the fingerprint security system on Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Porsche CEO Says Supercar Is Not Dead: Cue the Spyder 918

Porsche CEO Says Supercar Is Not Dead: Cue the Spyder 918

TheStreet (Apr. 16, 2014) The Porsche Spyder 918 proves that, in an automotive world obsessed with fuel efficiency, the supercar is not dead. Porsche North America CEO Detlev von Platen attributes the brand's consistent sales growth -- 21% in 2013 -- with an investment in new technology and expanded performance dynamics. The hybrid Spyder 918 has 887 horsepower and 944 lb-ft of torque, but it can run 18 miles on just an electric charge. The $845,000 vehicle is not a consumer-targeted vehicle but a brand statement. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
Industry's Optimism Shines At New York Auto Show

Industry's Optimism Shines At New York Auto Show

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) After seeing auto sales grow last month, there's plenty for the industry to celebrate as it rolls out its newest designs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ford Mustang Fetes Its 50th Atop Empire State Building

Ford Mustang Fetes Its 50th Atop Empire State Building

AFP (Apr. 16, 2014) Ford celebrated the 50th birthday of its beloved Mustang by displaying a new model of the convertible on top of the Empire State Building in New York. Duration: 00:28 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins