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Many Parents Want Distance Between Own Kids And Those With Mental Illness

Date:
March 21, 2007
Source:
Center For The Advancement Of Health
Summary:
New research suggests that Americans are more likely to socially reject children with mental illness than they are those with physical illnesses such as asthma.

New research suggests that Americans are more likely to socially reject children with mental illness than they are those with physical illnesses such as asthma.

“Many respondents did not want their children to become friends with other kids identified as having mental illnesses or have them come over to spend an evening socializing,” said Jack Martin, Ph.D., lead study author.

The Indiana University research team looked at data from a national face-to-face interview of adults who were given descriptions of children of various ages with symptoms that were similar to asthma, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression or “normal troubles.” The interviewer never mentioned a specific diagnosis.

“We used asthma as a baseline condition because it represents a physical problem with a known and standard treatment,” said Martin, who is executive director of the university’s Karl Schuessler Institute for Social Research, in Bloomington. “We wanted to see if Americans felt differently about a child with a mental health problem.”

Almost 30 percent of the 1,134 participants said they would not like their child to become friends of a child with depression, and almost one in four said the same thing about ADHD. Roughly 20 percent said they did not want a child with either ADHD or depression living next door. But when asked about friendship with children with ”normal troubles” and asthma symptoms, negative responses dropped to 10 percent or less in all categories.

“[People] aren’t as concerned, however, if a child with mental illness is in the same class as their child or if a child with mental illness moved into their neighborhood,” Martin said. “This study suggests that a large number of Americans just don’t want their kids to be spending time with other kids suffering from ADHD or depression.”

The study appears in the latest issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Center For The Advancement Of Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Center For The Advancement Of Health. "Many Parents Want Distance Between Own Kids And Those With Mental Illness." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070320110106.htm>.
Center For The Advancement Of Health. (2007, March 21). Many Parents Want Distance Between Own Kids And Those With Mental Illness. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070320110106.htm
Center For The Advancement Of Health. "Many Parents Want Distance Between Own Kids And Those With Mental Illness." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070320110106.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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