Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Improving Hip Replacement Surgery By Using Better Components

Date:
April 29, 2007
Source:
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Summary:
Researchers at NIST are developing state-of-the-art measuring techniques, similar to those used in making aerospace components fit together precisely, that soon could improve success rates for hip replacement surgery.

NIST prototype hip replacement "phantom" (left) provides a precisely measured coordinate system and magnetic ball and socket joint to calibrate and to measure the clinically relevant performance of Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery tracking instruments used in delicate operations to install artificial hip joints (right).
Credit: NIST

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are developing state-of-the-art measuring techniques, similar to those used in making aerospace components fit together precisely, that soon could improve success rates for hip replacement surgery.

Related Articles


At the request of a group of prominent orthopaedic surgeons and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), the NIST researchers are working to improve calibrations and operating room testing of the Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) tracking instruments surgeons use to plan the delicate, highly complex operation.

To be completely successful, CAOS hip replacement surgery must take into account tiny human skeletal differences. Imprecise measurements, which could result from conditions seemingly unrelated to the surgery, such as operation room noise or temperature, can lead to poor positioning of implants, leaving some former patients with discomfort during walking and, in rarer cases, a need to redo the operation.

The researchers have built a lightweight device called a "phantom" that resembles the artificial socket, ball and femur substitutes that surgeons use to replace the joint and bone in hip operations, based on a calibrated XY coordinate frame. They drilled tiny holes at precisely measured intervals into the phantom and made cuts at precisely measured angles, favored by surgeons for CAOS operations.

Because the precise coordinates of the mechanical (magnetic) ball and socket joint center of rotation have been measured, manufacturers of CAOS tracking sensors can use the phantom to test the accuracy of their measuring instruments. Surgeons also should be able to test the accuracy of their CAOS devices, just before making their first incision, to measure ball and socket joint center of rotation coordinates, angles for cuts into the bone and places for the insertion of screws

Currently, no standardized approach to the evaluation of CAOS technology exists, but an ASTM International committee is working on the establishment of such standards. In the coming months NIST will submit its hip CAOS phantom to orthopaedic surgeons for review. Clinical trials could follow. If the device wins Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approval, it can be expected to find its way into operating rooms across the country and world. The researchers look forward to extending the application of the technology to surgical procedures on the knee and shoulder.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute of Standards and Technology. "Improving Hip Replacement Surgery By Using Better Components." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070427125703.htm>.
National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2007, April 29). Improving Hip Replacement Surgery By Using Better Components. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070427125703.htm
National Institute of Standards and Technology. "Improving Hip Replacement Surgery By Using Better Components." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070427125703.htm (accessed March 4, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Adults Only Get The Flu Twice A Decade, Researchers Say

Adults Only Get The Flu Twice A Decade, Researchers Say

Newsy (Mar. 4, 2015) Researchers found adults only get the flu about once every five years. Scientists analyzed how a person&apos;s immunity builds up over time as well. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mount Everest Has a Poop Problem

Mount Everest Has a Poop Problem

Buzz60 (Mar. 4, 2015) With no bathrooms to use, climbers of Mount Everest have been leaving human waste on the mountain for years, and it&apos;s becoming a health issue. Mike Janela (@mikejanela) has more. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mom Triumphs Over Tragedy, Helps Other Families

Mom Triumphs Over Tragedy, Helps Other Families

AP (Mar. 3, 2015) After her son, Dax, died from a rare form of leukemia, Julie Locke decided to give back to the doctors at St. Jude Children&apos;s Research Hospital who tried to save his life. She raised $1.6M to help other patients and their families. (March 3) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Looted and Leaking, South Sudan's Oil Wells Pose Health Risk

Looted and Leaking, South Sudan's Oil Wells Pose Health Risk

AFP (Mar. 3, 2015) Thick black puddles and a looted, leaking ruin are all that remain of the Thar Jath oil treatment facility, once a crucial part of South Sudan&apos;s mainstay industry. Duration: 01:13 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins