Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New, Less Painful Wound Treatment For Pediatric Patients

Date:
May 3, 2007
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
Negative pressure wound therapy is a new innovation in treating severe and complex wounds in children that decreases the need for frequent and stressful dressing changes.

Negative pressure wound therapy is a new innovation in treating severe and complex wounds in children that decreases the need for frequent and stressful dressing changes. A new study in Wound Repair and Regeneration shows that this technique has a wide range of applications with children, and can be life-saving.

Related Articles


“This wound therapy is usually delivered via a vacuum system which applies negative suction pressure to the wound base through a sponge sealed to the wound by an adherent drape,” says study senior author Dr. Oluyinka Olutoye. “The system accelerates wound contraction, decreases wound and tissue swelling, increases local microcirculation, provides a closed, moist healing environment and stimulates the formation of granulation tissue, an important indicator of healing tissue.”

Ninety-three percent of the children given the treatment showed decreased wound volume, and the average amount of wound closure was 80 percent. “This is very good news for children with large and complex wounds, such as abdominal wall defects or disrupted surgical wounds,” says Dr. Olutoye. “Not only is the therapy very effective, but it eliminates the need for dozens of painful and frightening gauze dressing changes.”

According to Dr. Olutoye, the therapy offers other benefits. Because the therapy is less painful, less pain medication may be required. In addition, the dressing is sturdy and guards against infection. It can even be worn on an outpatient basis, using smaller portable equipment.

Further research is needed, however, to ensure that the therapy is used effectively. “Additional studies may help to harness the benefits of this technology in this unique and vulnerable population,” says Dr. Olutoye.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "New, Less Painful Wound Treatment For Pediatric Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070502155147.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2007, May 3). New, Less Painful Wound Treatment For Pediatric Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070502155147.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "New, Less Painful Wound Treatment For Pediatric Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070502155147.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins