Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Drug-eluting Stent Controversy Outlined

Date:
August 9, 2007
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
The Summer 2007 issue of the American Heart Hospital Journal explores one of the pivotal issues in cardiology today, the drug-eluting stent. What are some of the risks involved?

The Summer 2007 issue of The American Heart Hospital Journal explores one of the pivotal issues in cardiology today, the drug-eluting stent (DES). Through commentaries from ten leading national and international specialists, the issue presents a comprehensive discussion on the explosive growth and the potential risks of DESs.

The issue reports on the initial enthusiasm for drug-eluting stents, the great advances made possible by their use, and explores the significance of the benefits and disadvantages revealed through their high-volume adoption.

Dr. Ulrich Sigwart of University Hospital in Geneva, Switzerland, author of one of the studies, examines the sobering current appraisal of DES use, in contrast to the triumphs of their early success. “Subacute stent thrombosis due to incomplete intimal coverage, the formation of blood clots that can occur when the inner layers of blood vessels are not fully treated, remains the Achilles’ heel of DES use,” says Dr. Sigwart. “The polymer matrix used for the delivery of drugs, which clearly induces inflammatory responses, may, in part, be responsible for very late thrombosis.”

Dr. Renu Virmani and colleagues at the CVPath Institute of Gaithersburg, Maryland base the judgments in their article on the evidence obtained through pathologic studies of patients dying after stent implantation. “These data indicate that DESs cause both substantial impairment in arterial healing characterized by lack of complete re-endothlialization (the re-healing of the inner surfaces of vessels after stenting) and persistence of fibrin, a protein that indicates blood clotting, when compared with bare metal stents. This delayed healing is the primary substrate underlying all cases of late DES thrombosis at autopsy.”

In contrast, Drs. Williams and Abbott, of Brown Medical School and affiliated with Rhode Island Hospital, note, “DESs are a revolutionary advancement in interventional cardiology and are here to stay. Recognizing that they are different from bare metal stents, it is prudent to exercise caution with these devices and avoid using them in patients in whom dual antiplatelet therapy, a common practice used to reduce blood clotting, is unlikely or impossible.”

Dr. Peter Fitzgerald of Stanford University Medical Center, who writes with his colleagues, Drs. Shimohama and Honda of the Center for Cardiovascular Technology, offers his view of the future of DESs. “While first generation DESs place great emphasis on efficacy, long-term safety issues have arisen, making DESs stand in an exquisite balance among occasionally conflicting effects. Careful reexamination of research findings, as well as redefinition of safe and effective outcomes, will lead future stent technology in the optimal direction.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Drug-eluting Stent Controversy Outlined." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070808132016.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2007, August 9). Drug-eluting Stent Controversy Outlined. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070808132016.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Drug-eluting Stent Controversy Outlined." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070808132016.htm (accessed April 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, April 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins