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When Are Toddlers Old Enough To Think About Out-of-sight Objects?

Date:
September 4, 2007
Source:
Association for Psychological Science
Summary:
One of the most distinctive characteristics of humans is probably one you don't think of very often -- the capacity to learn based merely on what someone tells you. Researchers are attempting to discover when when we become capable of revising our mental representations of objects or situations based solely on what someone tells us.

One of the most distinctive characteristics of humans is probably one you don't think of very often -- the capacity to learn based merely on what someone tells you. Think about it: New information is most often given to us about entities that aren't present.

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For instance, if we are told that our neighbors' son has dyed his hair purple, we update our mental image of him to accommodate this newly acquired information.

What is unknown, however, is when we become capable of revising our mental representations of objects or situations based solely on what someone tells us.

To answer this question, Boston University psychologist Patricia Ganea and her colleagues set up a series of experiments.

The researchers asked 19-month and 22-month --old toddlers to name a toy that was presented to them in the lab. After a short time, the toy was taken from the toddlers and placed in an adjoining room. Later, while the toy was out of view, lab assistants told the toddlers that the toy had become soaking wet after someone mistakenly spilled a bucket of water.

The question was whether the toddlers would incorporate this information into their mental representation. When asked to retrieve the animal from the next room, would they reach for the newly wet stuffed toy, or a dry version identical to what they had been previously presented?

The researchers found that the 22-month-olds, but not the 19-month-olds, were able to identify the toy based solely on the property that they were told about but had never seen.

The study, appearing in the August issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests that before the end of their second year, toddlers have become capable of updating their knowledge using what other people tell them.

"This nascent ability," writes Ganea, "constitutes a significant cognitive advance, enabling children to vastly expand their knowledge by learning about the world through verbal interaction."


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The above story is based on materials provided by Association for Psychological Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Association for Psychological Science. "When Are Toddlers Old Enough To Think About Out-of-sight Objects?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070829122928.htm>.
Association for Psychological Science. (2007, September 4). When Are Toddlers Old Enough To Think About Out-of-sight Objects?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070829122928.htm
Association for Psychological Science. "When Are Toddlers Old Enough To Think About Out-of-sight Objects?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070829122928.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

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