Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Chemotherapy May Be Culprit For Fatigue In Breast Cancer Survivors

Date:
September 13, 2007
Source:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Summary:
Compared to healthy women, breast cancer survivors reported more days of fatigue and more severe fatigue symptoms. Fatigue is a common complaint in the general population and, anecdotally, common among cancer patients. Comparative fatigue studies between the two populations, however, have been marred by methodological shortcomings, such as poorly matched controls and patient populations.

A new study finds that, compared to healthy women, breast cancer survivors reported more days of fatigue and more severe fatigue symptoms. The study, published in Cancer, found women who received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy reported the most severe and prolonged fatigue.

Fatigue is a common complaint in the general population and, anecdotally, common among cancer patients. Comparative fatigue studies between the two populations, however, have been marred by methodological shortcomings, such as poorly matched controls and patient populations. The studies do not consistently agree whether or not fatigue is a more common complaint among cancer patients compared to the general population.

Dr. Paul Jacobsen from the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida and co-investigators followed 221 women with non-metastatic (early stage) breast cancer treated with either radiography (n=121) or a combination of chemotherapy and radiography (n=100) and 221 age- and geographically-matched healthy women (i.e., controls) at two, four, and six months after treatment.

The authors expected to find the greatest difference in fatigue scores just after treatment, diminishing with time. Surprisingly though, they found that breast cancer patients, had a significantly greater number of days with reported fatigue at each of the four assessments, and that even at the six-month follow-up assessment, a statistically significant and clinically meaningful group difference in fatigue duration was still evident. They studied further and found that the difference was attributable primarily to heightened fatigue in those women who received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

These findings provide strong evidence that women with non-metastatic breast cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy are at significantly greater risk for severe fatigue. The next step, explains Dr. Jacobsen, is to "explore whether interventions administered during or at the end of treatment are effective in preventing or limiting fatigue in the post-treatment period." They point in particular to the role of exercise, which has been shown to reduce fatigue in breast cancer survivors.

Article: "Fatigue After Treatment for Early Stage Breast Cancer: A Controlled Comparison," Paul B. Jacobsen, Kristine A. Donovan, Brent J. Small, Heather S. Jim, Pamela N. Munster, Michael A. Andrykowski, Cancer: Published Online: September 10, 2007 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr. 22993); Print Issue Date: October 15, 2007.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Chemotherapy May Be Culprit For Fatigue In Breast Cancer Survivors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070910080040.htm>.
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. (2007, September 13). Chemotherapy May Be Culprit For Fatigue In Breast Cancer Survivors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070910080040.htm
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Chemotherapy May Be Culprit For Fatigue In Breast Cancer Survivors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070910080040.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

Newsy (July 20, 2014) Cynthia Robinson claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company hid the health and addiction risks of its products, leading to the death of her husband in 1996. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tooth Plaque Provides Insight Into Diets Of Ancient People

Tooth Plaque Provides Insight Into Diets Of Ancient People

Newsy (July 19, 2014) Research on plaque from ancient teeth shows that our prehistoric ancestor's had a detailed understanding of plants long before developing agriculture. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contaminated Water Kills 3 Babies in South African Town

Contaminated Water Kills 3 Babies in South African Town

AFP (July 18, 2014) Contaminated water in South Africa's northwestern town of Bloemhof kills three babies and hospitalises over 500 people. The incident highlights growing fears over water safety in South Africa. Duration: 02:22 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins