Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Clinical Trials Are Testing Better Alternatives For Dialysis Patients

Date:
September 19, 2007
Source:
University of Cincinnati
Summary:
Having a healthy kidney is worth a billion dollars. But unhealthy kidneys cost more -- about $16 billion more annually in the US alone, according to a researcher studying nephrology and hypertension. Researchers are looking for ways to control costs while improving the quality of life for patients. One clinical trial includes the use of medicated wraps.

Some clinical trials include the use of medicated wraps, placed around the dialysis access area at the time of surgery.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Cincinnati

Having a healthy kidney is worth a billion dollars.

Related Articles


But unhealthy kidneys cost more—about $16 billion more per year in the US, according to Prabir Roy-Chaudhury, MD, PhD, associate professor in the division of nephrology and hypertension at the University of Cincinnati (UC).

“It costs about $17 billion a year to care for patients with end-stage kidney disease,” he said.

There are currently over 320,000 people undergoing hemodialysis in the United States, a process that costs a minimum of $60,000 per patient annually.

Hemodialysis is a technique in which a machine filters wastes out of a patient’s blood once the kidney fails. “In order to perform successful dialysis, it’s critical to have a functioning vascular access,” Roy-Chaudhury said.

There are two main types of permanent dialysis access: an arteriovenous fistula, which connects the artery and the vein directly, and an arteriovenous graft, which connects the artery and the vein using a plastic tube.

Unfortunately, these connections may only last between six and 12 months due to stenosis, or narrowing of the veins. As a result, hemodialysis patients often have repeated hospital admissions and surgeries in order to keep their dialysis access open.

In fact, problems associated with vascular access are probably the biggest factors that reduce the quality of life for hemodialysis patients, Roy-Chaudhury said. “Hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction is viewed as the Achilles heel of dialysis,” he added.

In order to reduce the problems linked with hemodialysis vascular-access dysfunction, Roy-Chaudhury, UC surgeons Rino Munda, MD, and Steve Woodle, MD, and colleagues in engineering, radiology, cardiology and pathology have established the Cincinnati Dialysis Access Research Program (CAP).

CAP is a multidisciplinary program that includes NIH-funded basic science research, industry- funded animal studies of new devices and clinical trials for the treatment and prevention of dialysis access stenosis.

Some of the clinical trials being conducted by UC’s division of nephrology and transplant surgery include the use of medicated wraps, placed around the access area at the time of surgery. Others include special balloons that allow physicians to deliver a drug directly to the outside of the vessel wall following expansion of the vessel.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati. "Clinical Trials Are Testing Better Alternatives For Dialysis Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912113904.htm>.
University of Cincinnati. (2007, September 19). Clinical Trials Are Testing Better Alternatives For Dialysis Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912113904.htm
University of Cincinnati. "Clinical Trials Are Testing Better Alternatives For Dialysis Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912113904.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins