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Canadians Welcome HPV Vaccine -- But Not At Any Price

Date:
October 26, 2007
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
Canadians would welcome a vaccine against the human papillomavirus if it were introduced at no charge, a Quebec, Canada survey suggests. Research shows that 91 percent of young women (18-25 year-olds) would agree to vaccination, and that 89 percent of men and women would recommend it to their daughters or nieces.

Canadians would welcome a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV) if it were introduced at no charge, a Quebec, Canada survey suggests. Research published in the journal BMC Public Health shows that 91% of young women (18-25 year-olds) would agree to vaccination, and that 89% of men and women would recommend it to their daughters or nieces.

Chantal Sauvageau and colleagues from Laval University hospital center in Quebec analysed the responses of 471 telephone interviewees (18-69 year-olds, 33% men) during February and March 2006. Awareness of HPV was low. Although 86% of the women interviewed had undergone at least one cervical smear (also known as a Pap test) in their life, only 15% of those interviewed had heard of HPV. When provided with information on HPV and the vaccine, a large majority were in favour of its uptake.

The authors state that "Despite low awareness of HPV infection, our findings suggest that most young women would accept a vaccine that protects against cervical cancer, especially if it is free of charge and recommended by a physician." However, they note that the level of acceptance dropped sharply (from 91% to 72%) when it was suggested that the vaccine might cost CN$100 (approximately $100 US).

The researchers do warn that up-take by pre-adolescents should not be taken for granted, as 31% of those interviewed were worried that giving girls the vaccine might result in them having sex at a younger age. HPV is the major cause of cervical cancer and is the most common sexually transmitted disease. A vaccine against some strains of HPV is now commercially available in Canada.

Article: Chantal Sauvageau, Bernard Duval, Vladimir Gilca, France Lavoie and Manale Ouakki, Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Screening Acceptability among Adults in Quebec, Canada , BMC Public Health (in press)


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The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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BioMed Central. "Canadians Welcome HPV Vaccine -- But Not At Any Price." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071025080912.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2007, October 26). Canadians Welcome HPV Vaccine -- But Not At Any Price. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071025080912.htm
BioMed Central. "Canadians Welcome HPV Vaccine -- But Not At Any Price." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071025080912.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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