Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Even Low Doses Of Arsenic -- At Levels Found In Drinking Water -- Can Be Harmful

Date:
November 19, 2007
Source:
Dartmouth College
Summary:
Dartmouth researchers find more evidence that arsenic at low doses (at levels found in US drinking water in some areas) can be harmful.

Low doses of arsenic disrupt the activity of a hormone critical in development -- further evidence that arsenic at low doses (at levels found in U.S. drinking water in some areas) can be harmful.
Credit: iStockphoto/Andrey Milkin

A team of Dartmouth Medical School (DMS) researchers has determined that low doses of arsenic disrupt the activity of a hormone critical in development. The finding is further evidence that arsenic at low doses (at levels found in U.S. drinking water in some areas) can be harmful.

Related Articles


"Arsenic is a natural, yet pervasive, chemical in the environment; we can't seem to escape it," says Joshua Hamilton, one of the authors on this study and the director of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences at Dartmouth and Dartmouth's Superfund Basic Research Program on Toxic Metals. "By learning how it adversely affects biological processes and at what levels we should be concerned, we will hopefully someday be able to mitigate its impact on human health." Hamilton is also a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at DMS.

Hamilton and his team, in previous work, have learned that arsenic at low doses appears to suppress the ability of all critical steroid receptors, including those for estrogen and testosterone, to respond to their normal hormone signals. Chemicals that disrupt steroid hormone receptor signaling are called endocrine disruptors. Arsenic can disrupt these hormone pathways at extremely low doses equivalent to what many people in the U.S. have in their drinking water.

This study set out to see whether arsenic can also disrupt the activity of two hormone receptors that are involved in normal development - the retinoic acid receptor and the thyroid hormone receptor, two important members of the larger nuclear hormone receptor family. While the researchers studied the impact on frog development, these two hormone receptors are also vital to human development.

"I believe this is the first demonstration in an animal model that arsenic actually disrupts a developmental process that is regulated by hormones, and it does this at extremely low doses that are directly relevant to human exposures of concern," says Hamilton.

The study appeared in the Oct. 26, 2007, online edition of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP), and it will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. The work is funded by grants to Dartmouth from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, a component of the National Institutes of Health. Other researchers on the paper include Jennifer C. Davey, Athena P. Nomikos, Manida Wungjiranirun, Jenna R. Sherman, Liam Ingram, Cavus Batki, and Jean P. Lariviere,


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Dartmouth College. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Dartmouth College. "Even Low Doses Of Arsenic -- At Levels Found In Drinking Water -- Can Be Harmful." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071114121310.htm>.
Dartmouth College. (2007, November 19). Even Low Doses Of Arsenic -- At Levels Found In Drinking Water -- Can Be Harmful. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071114121310.htm
Dartmouth College. "Even Low Doses Of Arsenic -- At Levels Found In Drinking Water -- Can Be Harmful." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071114121310.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) — Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins