Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

CT Scans To Determine Heart Disease In The Emergency Room

Date:
November 29, 2007
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
In the future, patients who arrive at a hospital emergency department complaining of chest pain may be diagnosed with a sophisticated CT scan. If the diagnosis is negative, the patient can go home -- and the total time at the hospital will be much shorter than it is today.

In the future, patients who arrive at a hospital Emergency Department complaining of chest pain may be diagnosed with a sophisticated CT scan. If the diagnosis is negative, the patient can go home — and the total time at the hospital will be much shorter than it is today.

Related Articles


That is the theory behind a study being presented at the RSNA November 26 by Rajan Agarwal, M.D., a resident in Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

“The cost of chest pain triage (where patients in the Emergency Department are prioritized based on their symptoms) and management has been estimated to be as high as $8 billion annually, with most patients ultimately not having to remain in the hospital. Therefore,” Dr. Agarwal states, “there is a tremendous opportunity to reduce health care costs if we can demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of this procedure with low-risk patients who go to the Emergency Department.”

Further, this reduced length of stay improves resource utilization by decreasing costs, improving inpatient bed shortages and reducing crowding in the Emergency Department.

In the study, a total of 202 patients, older than age 30, who came to the Emergency Department at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania between October 2005 and February 2007, and whose primary complaint was chest pain, were given an electrocardiogram and a specialized CT scan.

Patients were excluded from the study who were allergic to an iodine contrast, had an abnormal heart rate or could not take beta blockers. Patients who were admitted to the hospital were also excluded.

“We looked to determine the length of stay and times between critical points in the treatment of low-risk patients,” Dr. Agarwal explained.

“Patients were divided into three areas: all patients who received CT scans; patients who received the scans during 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. (ON hours) when the scans were available and 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. (OFF hours) when the scans were not available.

Results showed that patients who came into the Emergency Department during ON hours spent a total of 9 hours and 39 minutes in the department before being discharged; patients who came to the Emergency Department during OFF hours spent a total of 12 hours and 15 minutes in the unit. Patients who were referred to the CDU (Clinical Decision Unit, which provided the CT scan, as well as additional evaluation and observation) spent 21 hours and 50 minutes in the hospital if they came during ON hours and 18 hours and 38 minutes if they came during OFF hours.

Future studies, Dr. Agarwal suggests, will look at all the costs, including lab tests and diagnostic tests, associated with a low-risk patient’s visit to the Emergency Department.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "CT Scans To Determine Heart Disease In The Emergency Room." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071127115516.htm>.
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. (2007, November 29). CT Scans To Determine Heart Disease In The Emergency Room. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071127115516.htm
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "CT Scans To Determine Heart Disease In The Emergency Room." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071127115516.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins