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Simple Test Improves Accuracy Of Polygraph Results

Date:
November 29, 2007
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
In order to prevent false positive results in polygraph examinations, testing is set to err on the side of caution. This protects the innocent, but increases the chances that a guilty suspect will go unidentified. The use of a written test, known as Symptom Validity Testing, in conjunction with polygraph testing may improve the accuracy of results.

In order to prevent false positive results in polygraph examinations, testing is set to err on the side of caution. This protects the innocent, but increases the chances that a guilty suspect will go unidentified. A new study published in Psychophysiology finds that the use of a written test, known as Symptom Validity Testing (SVT), in conjunction with polygraph testing may improve the accuracy of results.

SVT is an independent measure that tests an entirely different psychological mechanism than polygraph examinations. It is based on the rationale that, when presented with both real and plausible-but-unrelated crime information, innocent suspects will show a random pattern of results when asked questions about the crime. SVT has previously been shown as effective in detecting post-traumatic stress disorder, amnesia and other perceptual deficits for specific events.

The study finds that SVT is also an easy and cost-effective method for determining whether or not a suspect is concealing information. In simulated cases of mock crime questioning and feigned amnesia, it accurately detected when a participant was lying.

Furthermore, when used in combination with the preexisting but relatively uncommon concealed information polygraph test (CIT), test accuracy is found to be higher than when either technique is used alone.

“We showed that the accuracy of a Concealed Information Test can be increased by adding a simple pencil and paper test,” says lead author Ewout Meijer of Maastricht University. “When ‘guilty’ participants were forced to choose one answer for each question, a substantial proportion did not succeed in producing the random pattern that can be expected from ‘innocent’ participants.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Simple Test Improves Accuracy Of Polygraph Results." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071128151812.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2007, November 29). Simple Test Improves Accuracy Of Polygraph Results. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071128151812.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Simple Test Improves Accuracy Of Polygraph Results." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071128151812.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

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