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Developing Innovative Tissue Processing Approaches

Date:
December 7, 2007
Source:
Rutgers University
Summary:
Scientists are working on improving dermal tissue processing. Tissue engineers will utilize a laser developed on the Raydiance Ultrashort Pulse laser platform, which can instantly vaporize material without heat or residual damage at very precise scales, down to a resolution of several microns. The technology is expected to deliver less expensive and faster solutions for skin transplants for burn and reconstructive procedures.
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Raydiance, Inc. has announced that is has entered into an innovative collaboration with Rutgers University and the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF), the nation's largest tissue bank, to improve the science of dermal tissue processing.

In a first-of-its-kind test, world leading tissue engineers will utilize a new type of laser developed on the Raydiance Ultrashort Pulse (USP) laser platform to maximize the transplants processed from donated dermal tissue. As part of this process, the collaboration will explore new ways to use the transformational power and precision of the Raydiance laser, which can instantly vaporize material without heat or residual damage at very precise scales, down to a resolution of several microns.

The collaboration involves MTF as the project sponsor, Rutgers as the center for developing innovative tissue processing approaches and Raydiance as the core laser technology provider. Experts from all three parties will work towards providing more advanced technology that results in less expensive and faster solutions for those in need of skin transplants for burn, complicated hernia repair, and reconstructive procedures.

Dr. Zhixiong (James) Guo, principal investigator for Rutgers University, said, "Having worked with lasers for years, the Raydiance laser platform is one hundred times more powerful than anything I have ever used before. Not only can it separate skin more precisely and effectively, but also it has the unique capability to decontaminate the surface of soft tissue. If our tests prove successful, we will be able to disrupt and reinvent dermal tissue processing as we know it. This is great news for burn victims as well as those suffering from cancer, degenerative joint disease, arthritis and other skin trauma."

Bruce Stroever, President and CEO of MTF, said "Over 900,000 Americans receive tissue transplants each year, but many more are in need. Preparing human tissue grafts is a complex and meticulous process. An important part of our mission is the ability to maximize the number and type of transplanted tissues processed from the gift of donation. We believe the Raydiance technology has the potential to process human tissue much more efficiently, increasing the supply of scarce dermal tissues. This would result in more usable tissue, offering the benefit of better outcomes for more patients."

Scott Davison, President of Raydiance, said, "We are delighted to work with Rutgers and MTF on this important project. The Raydiance USP laser platform is unlocking disruptive innovation across a range of industries, from materials science to next generation surgery to genomics. The unique challenges inherent in the way tissue is recovered today makes this is an excellent development category for our laser, one that truly plays to the strengths of Raydiance technology."

The initial phase of the project will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of USP laser processing of donor skin in the following areas:

  1. Separation of donor skin layers - Develop non-invasive laser-ablation methods to separate the skin's dermal and epidermal layers to improve and increase the usability and viability of limited donor tissues.
  2. Surface decontamination -- Develop non-intrusive sterilization techniques on donor skin and tendons to minimize collateral tissue damage while effectively removing viral or bacterial contamination.
  3. Removal of unwanted hairs - Develop a laser destruction method to effectively remove unwanted hair from donor tissue with minimal collateral tissue damage.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rutgers University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Rutgers University. "Developing Innovative Tissue Processing Approaches." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071204180531.htm>.
Rutgers University. (2007, December 7). Developing Innovative Tissue Processing Approaches. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071204180531.htm
Rutgers University. "Developing Innovative Tissue Processing Approaches." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071204180531.htm (accessed May 30, 2015).

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