Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Taxol With Avastin Greatly Slowed Breast Cancer Progression, Study Shows

Date:
January 1, 2008
Source:
Indiana University
Summary:
Treatment of breast cancer with Taxol and Avastin increased the period patients went without progression of their disease from 5.9 months to 11.8 months. "The tumor can't grow bigger than the size of a sesame seed without an oxygen supply," said one of the researchers. "And patients can stay on Avastin as long at it works. It is not a chemotherapy drug so it has minimal toxicity. "

Highly positive results are reported from the first nationwide clinical study showing the benefits of an antiangiogenic agent in breast cancer therapy.
Credit: Dawn Poland/iStockphoto

Highly positive results are reported from the first nationwide clinical study showing the benefits of an antiangiogenic agent in breast cancer therapy.

The study with Avastin showed the biggest improvement in metastatic breast cancer ever reported in a chemotherapy-based clinical trial. It nearly doubled the time between initiation of chemotherapy for metastatic disease and progression of the breast cancer tumors.

"This therapy is a one-two punch! You hit the tumor with the chemo and sabotage new blood vessel growth by restricting its oxygen supply with Avastin," said Dr. Melody Cobleigh, co-author of the study and director of the Coleman Foundation Comprehensive Breast Center at Rush. "This is a noteworthy advance in cancer treatment."

The study was coordinated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and Kathy Miller, M.D., associate professor of medicine and Sheila D. Ward Scholar at the Indiana University School of Medicine, is the lead author.

Dr. Miller said she found the results exciting because this was the first study to show that an antiangiogenic agent can delay progression of advanced breast cancer. The study looked at Taxol (paclitaxel), which is one of the standard agents for metastatic disease, with and without the addition of Avastin (bevacizumab).

"This study not only achieved the longest progression-free survival in advanced disease but the therapy achieved that improvement without adding to the day-to-day treatment burden and with only minor increases in toxicity," said Dr. Miller.

The study enrolled 722 women with metastatic disease from the United States, Canada, Peru and South Africa. Patients were randomized to one of two arms of the phase III study -- Taxol alone or Taxol with Avastin. The patients, who joined the study from December 2001 through May 2004, represented a balance of age, disease-free interval, estrogen-positive receptors and sites of disease.

The results show that treatment with Taxol and Avastin increased the period patients went without progression of their disease from 5.9 months to 11.8 months.

Avastin is a human monoclonal antibody that acts to reduce the development of blood vessels that feed tumors. Cancer tumors need an increasing supply of blood to grow and the development of the blood vessels to supply the tumor is a process called angiogenesis. Avastin already has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of colorectal and lung cancer.

"The tumor can't grow bigger than the size of a sesame seed without an oxygen supply," said Cobleigh. "And patients can stay on Avastin as long at it works. It is not a chemotherapy drug so it has minimal toxicity. "

According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 178,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and approximately 40,000 will die from the disease in the United States in 2007.

"The next step is to move Avastin into the initial treatment of breast cancer in hopes that it will prevent recurrence in the first place," said Dr. Miller.

Full results are reported in the Dec. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The first clinical study with Avastin in humans was done in 1997 at Indiana University School of Medicine by George W. Sledge Jr., M.D., a pioneer in the field of antiangiogenic research. Dr. Sledge, a breast cancer specialist and the Ballve-Lantero Professor of Oncology, also conducted a 1998 Avastin study for breast cancer patients. Both early studies produced positive results.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Indiana University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Indiana University. "Taxol With Avastin Greatly Slowed Breast Cancer Progression, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071227183824.htm>.
Indiana University. (2008, January 1). Taxol With Avastin Greatly Slowed Breast Cancer Progression, Study Shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071227183824.htm
Indiana University. "Taxol With Avastin Greatly Slowed Breast Cancer Progression, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071227183824.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins