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Do Today's Young People Really Think They Are So Extraordinary?

Date:
January 18, 2008
Source:
Association for Psychological Science
Summary:
When asked about the state of today's youth, former president Jimmy Carter recently mused "I've been a professor at Emory University for the past twenty years and I interrelate with a wide range of students...I don't detect that this generation is any more committed to personal gain to the exclusion of benevolent causes than others have been in the past." Now research is beginning to support this notion. Researchers found no evidence that today's young people have inflated impressions of themselves compared to the youth of previous generations.
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When asked about the state of today’s youth, former president Jimmy Carter recently mused “I’ve been a professor at Emory University for the past twenty years and I interrelate with a wide range of students...I don’t detect that this generation is any more committed to personal gain to the exclusion of benevolent causes than others have been in the past.”

Now research is beginning to support this notion.  Researchers found no evidence that today’s young people have inflated impressions of themselves compared to the youth of previous generations.

Psychologist Kali Trzesniewski of the University of Western Ontario and her colleagues Brent Donnellan and Richard Robins measured narcissism --a personality trait encompassing characteristics like arrogance, exhibitionism, and a sense of entitlement -- in over 25,000 college students from 1996 to 2007.  The researchers then compared their data to similar studies conducted in the late 1970’s to mid 1980’s and found no evidence that levels of narcissism had increased.

Levels of “self-enhancement” -- the tendency to hold unrealistically positive beliefs about the self -- were also assessed in a sample of high school seniors.  As with college students, the high school seniors showed no prominent increase on this component of narcissism.

“Today’s youth seem to be no more narcissistic and self-aggrandizing than previous generations,” write the authors.  “We were unable to find evidence that either narcissism or the closely related construct of self-enhancement has increased over the past three decades.”

The findings run counter to previous research and media reports claiming that narcissism has been steadily increasing among college students, leading some behavioral scientists to dub today’s youth as “generation me.”

But it appears, at least for now, that the youth of American have won a reprieve from being scolded as more aloof and self-involved than previous generations.

This research is scheduled to appear in the February issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Association for Psychological Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Association for Psychological Science. "Do Today's Young People Really Think They Are So Extraordinary?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080117101459.htm>.
Association for Psychological Science. (2008, January 18). Do Today's Young People Really Think They Are So Extraordinary?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080117101459.htm
Association for Psychological Science. "Do Today's Young People Really Think They Are So Extraordinary?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080117101459.htm (accessed July 3, 2015).

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