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Fragile X Syndrome May Be Caused By Two Duplicated Genes Producing Excess Protein

Date:
February 1, 2008
Source:
University of Adelaide
Summary:
Scientists have achieved a major breakthrough in discovering the causes of intellectual disability from fragile X syndrome. Intellectual disability affects 1-3% of the world's population, with 30% more men affected than women.

University of Adelaide geneticist Dr Jozef Gecz and a team of Belgium and UK scientists have achieved a major breakthrough in discovering the causes of intellectual disability. Intellectual disability affects 1-3% of the world's population, with 30% more men affected than women.

Dr Gecz, a senior researcher who is based at the Women's and Children's Hospital in Adelaide, has collaborated with an international research team to reveal that various mutations of a small part of the X chromosome lead to mental retardation.

Dr Gecz says the duplicated genes - dubbed HSD17B10 and HUWE1 - produce excess protein, which appears to be the trigger leading to intellectual disability.

The researchers used specialised molecular technology to study the X chromosomes of more than 500 families diagnosed with various forms of X chromosome-linked mental retardation.

In six of the families they discovered that a certain part of the X chromosome had been duplicated. Four of these families were from Australia. Moreover, in one of these genes, HUWE1, they identified a further three mutations in another three families, one of them from Australia.

"HUWE1 is a protein, which regulates TP53, an important tumour suppressor gene. One of TP53's functions is to regulate the renewal of neuronal cells in the brain. That is where we see the connection with HUWE1 and intellectual disability," Dr Gecz says.

"Through this research we hope to uncover the important role that these genes and their proteins play in the normal brain development and thus learning and memory."

This research is reported in the February issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics and comes after an intensive collaboration with scientists from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge, England and the Genetics of Learning Disability (GOLD) Service in NSW.

Dr Gecz's research has been funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Program grant, which is administered through the University of Adelaide.

Dr. Gecz said "Our next step is to see how frequent these mutations are among the isolated cases. Also, we will try to understand the molecular pathology of the associated disease and investigate the routes for possible future interventions and treatments."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Adelaide. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Adelaide. "Fragile X Syndrome May Be Caused By Two Duplicated Genes Producing Excess Protein." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080131091343.htm>.
University of Adelaide. (2008, February 1). Fragile X Syndrome May Be Caused By Two Duplicated Genes Producing Excess Protein. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080131091343.htm
University of Adelaide. "Fragile X Syndrome May Be Caused By Two Duplicated Genes Producing Excess Protein." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080131091343.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

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