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Gender, Time Of Day Affect Response To Vaccination

Date:
July 11, 2008
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
A new study in the journal Psychophysiology reveals that men, but not women, vaccinated in the morning produced a better peak antibody response to both hepatitis A and the influenza strain.
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A new study reveals that men, but not women, vaccinated in the morning produced a better peak antibody response to both hepatitis A and the influenza strain.

Led by Anna Catriona Phillips of the University of Birmingham, researchers assessed the response to a hepatitis A vaccine in young healthy adults and also examined responses to the annual influenza vaccination in older community-based adults.

In the first study, participants consisted of 75 University of Birmingham students who were vaccinated with the hepatitis A vaccine during a morning session (10 am to 12 pm) or early evening session (4 pm to 6 pm). In the second study, 90 older adults attended their medical practice for the annual influenza vaccination and received the vaccination in the morning between 8 am and 11 am or in the afternoon between 1 pm and 4 pm.

Men vaccinated in the morning showed the strongest immune response. Almost twice as many men showed a twofold increase in antibody response when vaccinated in the morning as opposed to the afternoon.

“If we can replicate these findings in a randomized controlled trial, there would be implications for the time of day for vaccinating those at risk,” the authors conclude. “Adults could be vaccinated at a specific time of day to increase their protection against the flu.”


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Phillips et al. Preliminary evidence that morning vaccination is associated with an enhanced antibody response in men. Psychophysiology, 2008; 45 (4): 663 DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2008.00662.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Gender, Time Of Day Affect Response To Vaccination." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080709153145.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, July 11). Gender, Time Of Day Affect Response To Vaccination. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080709153145.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Gender, Time Of Day Affect Response To Vaccination." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080709153145.htm (accessed September 1, 2015).

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