Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Formula Predicts Emergency Admissions In Adults Older Than 40

Date:
July 17, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Using data from clinical encounters and drug prescriptions over three years, researchers have devised a model to predict emergency hospital admissions in the following year in individuals age 40 and older, according to a new report.

Using data from clinical encounters and drug prescriptions over three years, researchers have devised a model to predict emergency hospital admissions in the following year in individuals age 40 and older, according to a new report.

Stratifying individuals by risk to target health care may help reverse the trend of increasing emergency hospital admissions, according to background information in the article. Several models have been previously developed to identify those at risk. However, most have focused on those older than 65 years or those who have already experienced multiple emergency admissions. "These algorithms clearly leave out of consideration the important group of people at high risk who are younger than 65 years and those who have never experienced an emergency admission but are likely to experience an emergency admission in the future," the authors write.

Peter T. Donnan, Ph.D., of the University of Dundee, Scotland, and colleagues studied 90,522 residents of Tayside, Scotland, where each individual who visits a general practitioner is given a 10-digit identifier. Participants were at least 40 years old when they entered the study between 1996 and 2004, had at least three years of data available on hospital use and drug prescribing and were followed for at least one year.

A total of 6,793 (7.5 percent) of the participants experienced an emergency hospital admission within one year of enrolling in the study. Those who were hospitalized tended to:

  • Be older and male
  • Live in an area with high social deprivation
  • Have received more respiratory medications
  • Have had previous emergency admissions, with average total days in the hospital six times greater than those who were not admitted on an emergency basis
  • Have been prescribed analgesics (pain medications), antibacterials, nitrates and diuretics

The researchers identified 35 such parameters that were used to derive the probability of emergency admission within the next year, expressed as a percentage. "As an example, consider a man aged 72 years and is from a highly deprived area; has previous emergency admissions, eight previous admissions and 106 total bed-days in the previous three years; and is in receipt of hypertension and heart failure drugs, nitrates and calcium channel blockers, respiratory drugs, anxiolytics, antidepressants, analgesics and antibacterials: the absolute risk of admission in the next year is 52.8 percent," the authors write.

On the other hand, a 50-year-old woman from an affluent area with no previous emergency admissions and one previous hospital admission with a one-day stay who takes ulcer-healing drugs, diuretics and antibiotics would have a 2.4 percent risk of emergency admission in the next year.

The model "provides a useful tool for the individual clinician in face-to-face consultation as well as the general practice as a whole, and for health insurers, policy makers and planners at the health board level faced with the increasing prevalence of hospital use," the authors conclude. "This work has immediate relevance to developing policy and service reorganization, as well as informing future intervention studies of different models of case management."

This study was funded by an unrestricted grant from NHS Tayside.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Peter T. Donnan; David W. T. Dorward; Bill Mutch; Andrew D. Morris. Development and Validation of a Model for Predicting Emergency Admissions Over the Next Year (PEONY): A UK Historical Cohort Study. Arch Intern Med., 2008;168(13):1416-1422 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Formula Predicts Emergency Admissions In Adults Older Than 40." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080714162615.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, July 17). Formula Predicts Emergency Admissions In Adults Older Than 40. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080714162615.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Formula Predicts Emergency Admissions In Adults Older Than 40." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080714162615.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins