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Immigrant Youths Explore Identity In High School

Date:
July 15, 2008
Source:
Society for Research in Child Development
Summary:
Research conducted among 380 high school students from Asian and Latin American immigrant families revealed that many adolescents change the labels used to describe themselves from year to year. Teens that grew up in immigrant families largely chose hyphenated labels (e.g. Mexican-American). First-generation teens (born outside of the US) more often chose a national origin label (e.g. Chinese). The findings underscore that adolescence is a time of changing identification with American society for immigrant teens.
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FULL STORY

Children from immigrant families are assumed to give up their families' ethnic and cultural background in order to assimilate with American culture. But a new study shows that in fact, they find ways to combine their cultural heritage with their identification as members of American society, especially during the high school years. The types of labels they create and use could foreshadow the types of labels used by the larger society in the years to come.

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, Wake Forest University, and Williamette University.

"Given that immigrant families comprise the large majority of those with Asian and Latin American backgrounds and that these are the two fastest rising ethnic groups in the United States, the outcome of these explorations will have implications for the nature of ethnic categories and ethnic identity in the broader society," according to Andrew J. Fuligni, professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the study's lead author.

The researchers studied about 380 adolescents from Asian and Latin American immigrant families in Los Angeles over the course of four years of high school. The youths chose from a long list of ethnic labels that included terms referring to national origin (such as Mexican), pan-ethnic terms (such as Asian), and terms including the word "American" (such as American or Asian American). They study also assessed adolescents' degree of attachment to their ethnic background, the amount of exploration they'd done of their cultural heritage, and their proficiency in their families' native language.

Most teenagers who grow up in immigrant families choose a hyphenated label (such as Mexican-American) to describe themselves, according to the study. Moreover, significant numbers of these adolescents change their labels from year to year, suggesting that high school is a time for youths from immigrant families to explore their identities.

The study also found that first-generation teens (i.e., those who were born outside the United States) were more likely to choose a national origin label (such as Chinese) to describe themselves than were second-generation teens (i.e., those who were born in America to foreign-born parents). Furthermore, teens reported higher levels of ethnic attachment, exploration, and native language proficiency during the years in which they selected a national origin label to describe themselves than in other years.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Research in Child Development. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Fuligni et al. Stability and Change in Ethnic Labeling Among Adolescents From Asian and Latin American Immigrant Families. Child Development, 2008; 79 (4): 944 DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01169.x

Cite This Page:

Society for Research in Child Development. "Immigrant Youths Explore Identity In High School." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080715071432.htm>.
Society for Research in Child Development. (2008, July 15). Immigrant Youths Explore Identity In High School. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 22, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080715071432.htm
Society for Research in Child Development. "Immigrant Youths Explore Identity In High School." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080715071432.htm (accessed May 22, 2015).

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