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Computerized Whiteboards Improve Classroom Learning, Study Suggests

Date:
September 5, 2008
Source:
Economic & Social Research Council
Summary:
The British government has invested more money in Interactive Whiteboards in its schools than any other government in the world. But is this huge investment worth it? Have the new data projection technologies allowed students to learn more effectively? This is the subject of recent research.

The British government has invested more money in Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs) in its schools than any other government in the world. But is this huge investment worth it? Have the new data projection technologies allowed students to learn more effectively?

'These IWBs have had a meteoric rise in popularity in schools,' says Sara Hennessy who carried out the project with Rosemary Deaney of Cambridge University. 'But, until recently, assumptions about how they have transformed teaching were not based on hard evidence.'

The system consists of a computer linked to a data projector and a large touch-sensitive board, which displays images, graphics, animations and videos. You can write captions directly onto the board and instantly convert your handwriting to type. You can create suspense by hiding and revealing text and graphics.

They can also be used with a special camera so that pupils can develop their own written ideas and images, and then share them with the class by projecting their work onto the IWB.

'We explored how teachers might use projection technology to give space, time and status to pupils' contributions to lessons. We wanted to look at the ways in which it could be used to challenge and develop pupils' thinking,' Dr Hennessy says. The research also discusses the dangers of technology-driven teaching and warns that time constraints can lead to superficial use of the technology.

In the study, English, history, mathematics and science teachers used interactive whiteboards and data projectors in various ways.

  • Circling and highlighting make complex ideas more concrete and draw attention to particular features
  • Spotlighting, enlarging and zooming can help to investigate detail and keep attention on key concepts
  • Dragging and dropping are used to classify objects.

A unique strength of IWB technology is that it allows teachers and students to revisit previous sessions of saved activity, which helps to reignite and build on earlier learning. The researchers also found that using IWBs can:

  • Provide new opportunities for learners to express themselves publicly, receive critical feedback and reformulate their thoughts.
  • Stimulate discussion.
  • Allow teachers to adapt to individual learning needs.

The project has provoked interest from academics, trainees and teacher educators. A series of 5 interactive CD-ROMs have been developed for teachers. These are designed to stimulate debate around key issues rather than offering models of 'best practice' and they are already proving influential in teacher education. The researchers are confident that the project will be welcomed by policymakers seeking a return on investment.

'We have shown that in the right hands the IWB can be a motivating and immensely powerful tool,' says Dr Hennessy. 'It allows teachers and pupils to build and test complex ideas together, and supports active learning in new ways.'

This research was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Economic & Social Research Council. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Economic & Social Research Council. "Computerized Whiteboards Improve Classroom Learning, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080904082744.htm>.
Economic & Social Research Council. (2008, September 5). Computerized Whiteboards Improve Classroom Learning, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080904082744.htm
Economic & Social Research Council. "Computerized Whiteboards Improve Classroom Learning, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080904082744.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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