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Improved Spectrometer Based On Nonlinear Optics

Date:
November 19, 2008
Source:
Optical Society of America
Summary:
Scientists have created a new highly sensitive infrared spectrometer. The device converts light from the infrared part of the spectrum to the visible part, where the availability of superior optical detectors results in strongly improved sensing capabilities.

Scientists at Stanford University and Japan's National Institute of Informatics have created a new highly sensitive infrared spectrometer. The device converts light from the infrared part of the spectrum to the visible part, where the availability of superior optical detectors results in strongly improved sensing capabilities.

The research will appear in the Nov. 24 issue of Optics Express, the Optical Society's open access journal.

The new spectrometer is 100 times more sensitive than current commercial optical spectrum analyzers used in industrial applications such as optical communication, semiconductor microelectronics and forensic analysis.

Current spectrometers being used on the market today cover a wide spectral range, allow for moderately fast wavelength sweeps, have a good spectral resolution and don't require cryogenic cooling. However, the sensitivity of these instruments is limited, making them unsuitable for capturing single-photon-level spectra at telecommunication wavelengths.

Cryogenic cooling can increase the sensitivity of these devices, yet reduces the usefulness for industrial applications. One possible solution is to up-convert near-infrared to visible light in a nonlinear medium. The up-converted photons can then be detected using a single-photon detector for visible light.

The authors use a single-photon counting module, which results in 100 times better sensitivity. They implemented the frequency conversion via sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide, which can be thought of as combining two low-energy photons to get one high-energy photon.

Key Findings

  • The up-conversion based spectrometer's sensitivity is 100 times higher compared to current commercial optical spectrum analyzers.
  • Cryogenic cooling is not required for increased sensitivity, making the device practical for a variety of industrial applications.
  • The cost and system complexity of the spectrometer is reduced because it only uses one single-photon detector instead of an array of detectors.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Optical Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Qiang Zhang, Carsten Langrock, M. M. Fejer, and Yoshihisa Yamamoto. Waveguide-Based Single-Pixel Up-Conversion Infrared Spectrometer. Optics Express, 2008; 16 (24): 19557-19561 DOI: 10.1364/OE.16.019557

Cite This Page:

Optical Society of America. "Improved Spectrometer Based On Nonlinear Optics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081112113705.htm>.
Optical Society of America. (2008, November 19). Improved Spectrometer Based On Nonlinear Optics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081112113705.htm
Optical Society of America. "Improved Spectrometer Based On Nonlinear Optics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081112113705.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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