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Household Exposure To Toxic Chemicals Lurks Unrecognized, Researchers Find

Date:
November 26, 2008
Source:
Brown University
Summary:
Many women are surprised to learn the extent of personal, in-home contamination caused by exposure to everyday consumer products, according to a team of researchers. The study, published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, is one of the first accounts of participants' responses to learning personal exposure data, research critical to environmental science and public health.

Although Americans are becoming increasingly aware of toxic chemical exposure from everyday household products like bisphenol A in some baby bottles and lead in some toys, women do not readily connect typical household products with personal chemical exposure and related adverse health effects, according to research from the December issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. Brown University sociologist Phil Brown is a co-author of the study.

“People more readily equate pollution with large-scale contamination and environmental disasters, yet the products and activities that form the backdrop to our everyday lives — electronics, cleaners, beauty products, food packaging — are a significant source of daily personal chemical exposure that accumulates over time,” said sociologist Rebecca Gasior Altman, lead author of the study, “Pollution Comes Home and Gets Personal: Women’s Experience of Household Chemical Exposure.” Altman received a Ph.D. from Brown in 2008.

Altman and the team examined how women interpreted and reacted to information about chemical contamination in their homes and bodies. After reviewing their personal chemical exposure data, most women were surprised and puzzled at the number of contaminants detected. They initially had difficulty relating the chemical results for their homes, located in rural and suburban communities, with their images of environmental problems, which they associated with toxic contamination originating outside the home from military or industrial activities, accidents or dumping.

“This work underscores the value of having sociologists collaborate with life scientists to examine the personal experience of environmental problems,” said Brown. “While there has been a rapid rise in bio-monitoring and household exposure assessment, we’re lacking social science data on how people respond to research that involves their homes and bodies. Our findings are among the first to examine the full ‘exposure experience.’”

“This research illustrates how science is beginning to play a paramount role in discovering and redefining environmental problems that are not immediately perceptible through direct experience,” Altman said. “Pollution at home has been a blind spot for society. The study documents that an important shift occurs in how people understand environmental pollution, its sources and possible solutions as they learn about chemicals from everyday products that are detectable in urine samples and the household dust collecting under the sofa.”

Though some scientists and government officials worry such information will provoke fears, the interdisciplinary team discovered that people who learned about chemicals in their homes and bodies were not alarmed and were eager for more, not less, information about how typical household products can expose them to chemicals that may affect health.

The researchers interviewed 25 women, all of whom had participated in an earlier study, the Silent Spring Institute’s Household Exposure Study (HES), which tested for 89 environmental pollutants in air, dust and urine samples from 120 Cape Cod households. The study found about 20 target chemicals per home on average, including pesticides and compounds from plastics, cleaners, furniture, cosmetics, and other products. Nearly all participants in the HES chose to learn their personal results, and the 25 selected for the current research were interviewed about their experiences learning the results for their home and the study as a whole.

This new study is among the first to apply the tools and perspectives of sociology to biomonitoring and exposure assessment research, and is the first to investigate the experience of personal results-reporting in a study of a wide range of contaminants. According to the researchers, the Household Exposure Study has set an example that is shifting scientific practice, as it was among the first to adopt a right-to-know framework for reporting all results to interested participants.

In addition to Altman and Brown, this study was co-authored by Rachel Morello-Frosch, epidemiologist and environmental health scientist at the University of California–Berkeley; Julia Green Brody and Ruthann Rudel, environmental health scientists at Silent Spring Institute; and Mara Averick, a 2006 graduate of Brown who served as a research assistant as an undergraduate.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Science Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Brown University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Pollution Comes Home and Gets Personal: Women%u2019s Experience of Household Chemical Exposure. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, December 2008

Cite This Page:

Brown University. "Household Exposure To Toxic Chemicals Lurks Unrecognized, Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081121092451.htm>.
Brown University. (2008, November 26). Household Exposure To Toxic Chemicals Lurks Unrecognized, Researchers Find. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081121092451.htm
Brown University. "Household Exposure To Toxic Chemicals Lurks Unrecognized, Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081121092451.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

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