Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Drug Combination Improves Or Stabilizes Disease For Relapsed Multiple Myeloma Patients

Date:
December 12, 2008
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Researchers have found that a new combination of medications designed to maximize immune functions improved or stabilized multiple myeloma for 76 percent of patients who had relapsed after previous treatment.

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that a new combination of medications designed to maximize immune functions improved or stabilized multiple myeloma for 76 percent of patients who had relapsed after previous treatment.

Interim results of an ongoing clinical trial evaluating pomalidomide, a new immunomodulatory agent, combined with dexamethasone (pom/dex), were presented today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Francisco. Pomalidomide, also referred to as CC-4047, is the latest in the class of immunomodulatory agents that also includes thalidomide and lenalidomide.

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, a type of white blood cells in the bone marrow, that affects approximately 3 in 100,000 people each year. There is no cure. While the condition can be managed, often with good results, the disease can lead to erosion of the bones, causing bone pain and fractures.

Immunomodulatory drugs work by interfering with cancer cell growth and by stimulating the immune system to attack the cancer cells. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of thalidomide and lenalidomide to be given with dexamethasone for previously treated cases of multiple myeloma.

The study opened in November 2007 and has accrued 60 patients. To date, 58 percent of patients have responded to therapy with at least a 50 percent drop in the detectable tumor burden as measured by blood protein levels, a marker for myeloma. This included one patient who achieved a complete remission -- no signs of the cancer -- and 14 patients (23 percent) who achieved at least a 90 percent drop in blood proteins. Eleven other patients (18 percent) remained stable.

"These are high remission rates, and they happened quickly," says Martha Lacy, M.D., Mayo Clinic hematologist and lead researcher on the study. Also encouraging, says Dr. Lacy, is that treatment did not cause significant side effects in most patients. Side effects included anemia and declines in blood counts, most often mild in both.

In the study, patients took pomalidomide (2 milligrams [mg]) orally daily for a 28-day cycle. Dexamethasone (40 mg) was taken orally on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of each cycle. Patients also took 325 mg of aspirin daily to prevent blood clots, a concern associated with immunomodulatory agents. Blood clots can occur with use of any IMiD, but the risk increases as the dose of dexamethasone increases.

The dosage of dexamethasone in the current trial is one-third of the dose that was used in the registration trial that led to FDA approval for lenalidomide in previously treated myeloma patients. "We're getting good results with less toxicity compared to what we've seen in the past," says Dr. Lacy. "And, so far, no patients have had blood clots."

Another key finding was that pom/dex was helpful for 29 percent of patients who previously did not respond to treatment with lenalidomide.

"We are excited about the potential of this drug combination to significantly help patients with myeloma," says Dr. Lacy. "Based on these encouraging results, we are expanding the study to include other patient populations that may benefit from this therapy."

This sponsored research study was funded by Celgene. Other Mayo researchers involved in this study include: Suzanne Hayman, M.D.; Morie Gertz, M.D.; Angela Dispenzieri, M.D.; Steven Zeldenrust, M.D., Ph.D.; Shaji Kumar, M.D.; Philip Greipp, M.D.; John Lust, M.D., Ph.D.; Stephen Russell, M.D., Ph.D.; Francis Buadi, M.D.; Robert Kyle, M.D.; Rafael Fonseca, M.D.; P. Leif Bergsagel, M.D.; Vivek Roy, M.D.; Joseph Mikhael, M.D.; Keith Stewart, M.B.Ch.B.; Jacob Allred; Kristina Laumann; Melanie Thompson; Sumithra Mandrekar, Ph.D.; and S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Drug Combination Improves Or Stabilizes Disease For Relapsed Multiple Myeloma Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209111510.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2008, December 12). Drug Combination Improves Or Stabilizes Disease For Relapsed Multiple Myeloma Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209111510.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Drug Combination Improves Or Stabilizes Disease For Relapsed Multiple Myeloma Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209111510.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

AFP (July 23, 2014) America may be the world’s richest country, but in terms of healthcare, the World Health Organisation ranks it 37th. Thousands turned out for a free clinic run by "Remote Area Medical" with a visit from the Governor of Virginia. Duration: 2:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins