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New Year's Eve Is Extended : New Year's Eve Will Last One Second Longer Due To A Leap Second

Date:
December 10, 2008
Source:
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)
Summary:
For three years it was possible to do without it. But now it's become necessary again. This coming New Year's Eve, the radio controlled clocks will, after 0:59:59, instead of jumping to 1 o'clock at the next tick of the second, pause shortly in order to insert a small portion of extra time: a leap second.
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For three years it was possible to do without it. But now it's become necessary again. This coming New Year's Eve, the radio controlled clocks will, after 0:59:59, instead of jumping to 1 o'clock at the next tick of the second, pause shortly in order to insert a small portion of extra time: a leap second.

The Inter-national Earth Rotation Service (IERS) in Paris has prescribed this addition to coordinated universal time (UTC), as our Earth is again too much out of sync.

The Earth lags behind atomic clock time, whose ticking seconds do not pay at-tention to any earthly fluctuation.

This leap second will be dispensed to the German clocks by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braun-schweig.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). "New Year's Eve Is Extended : New Year's Eve Will Last One Second Longer Due To A Leap Second." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209130258.htm>.
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). (2008, December 10). New Year's Eve Is Extended : New Year's Eve Will Last One Second Longer Due To A Leap Second. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209130258.htm
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). "New Year's Eve Is Extended : New Year's Eve Will Last One Second Longer Due To A Leap Second." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209130258.htm (accessed September 4, 2015).

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