Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

High Level Of Medical Mistrust Among Minority Women Impacts Quality Of Health Care

Date:
February 17, 2009
Source:
Michigan State University
Summary:
Nearly 70 percent of minority women agree that health-care organizations sometimes deceive or mislead patients, according to a new study.

Nearly 70 percent of minority women agree that health-care organizations sometimes deceive or mislead patients, one of the key findings of a Michigan State University study that researchers say can prevent women from getting breast cancer screenings.

The study of 341 Arab-American, African-American and Latina women was created to examine levels of medical mistrust and assess the impact on whether the participants received recommended breast cancer screenings, said Karen Patricia Williams, lead author and an assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology in MSU’s College of Human Medicine.

Williams presented her work at the American Association for Cancer Research’s conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, which was held Feb 3 to Feb. 6 in Arizona. The study was funded by Susan G. Komen for the Cure in Dallas.

“This study reveals an important association between medical mistrust and appropriately timed breast cancer screening among many minority women,” Williams said. “We found high levels of mistrust, regardless of the racial-ethnic group. People are less likely toengage in preventive screening practices, thereby making them more likely to suffer from conditions such as breast cancer that if caught early could be better treated.”

Williams added the findings also show many minority women only will use the health-care system when they are very sick, a medical behavior that taxes the health-care system.

The women in the study answered questions as part of a seven-item Medical Mistrust Index; data on breast cancer screenings and socio-demographics also were collected.

Among other findings:

  • African-American women were found to have higher levels of mistrust; 39 percent strongly agreed that health-care organizations don’t keep information private, compared to 15 percent for Latina women and 9 percent for Arab-American women.
  • 44 percent of women who had never received a clinical breast exam agreed that health-care organizations have sometimes done harmful experiments on patients without their knowledge.
  • 64 percent of women who had not received a breast exam in the past 12 months agreed with the statement that they sometimes wonder if health-care organizations really know what they are doing.

Williams said mistrust can come from a variety of places, most notably from personal and family experience, from how a patient is cared for by a doctor to how they are treated by a receptionist. What is vital is addressing and overcoming that mistrust, Williams said.

“Everyone involved in the health-care experience needs to focus on respecting the patient and family, regardless of their race, gender, ethnicity, insurance or lack thereof,” she said. “We need to provide everyone with the same gold standard regardless of any other factors.”

Williams plans to publish a paper on her research and explore whether interventions using community health workers can make a difference in decreasing medical mistrust.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Michigan State University. "High Level Of Medical Mistrust Among Minority Women Impacts Quality Of Health Care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090205110612.htm>.
Michigan State University. (2009, February 17). High Level Of Medical Mistrust Among Minority Women Impacts Quality Of Health Care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090205110612.htm
Michigan State University. "High Level Of Medical Mistrust Among Minority Women Impacts Quality Of Health Care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090205110612.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mini Pacemaker Has No Wires

Mini Pacemaker Has No Wires

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Cardiac experts are testing a new experimental device designed to eliminate major surgery and still keep the heart on track. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
After Cancer: Rebuilding Breasts With Fat

After Cancer: Rebuilding Breasts With Fat

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) More than 269 million women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Many of them will need surgery and radiation, but there’s a new simple way to reconstruct tissue using a patient’s own fat. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood Clots in Kids

Blood Clots in Kids

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Every year, up to 200,000 Americans die from a blood clot that travels to their lungs. You’ve heard about clots in adults, but new research shows kids can get them too. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Radio Waves Knock out Knee Pain

Radio Waves Knock out Knee Pain

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Doctors have used radio frequency ablation or RFA to reduce neck and back pain for years. But now, that same technique is providing longer-term relief for patients with severe knee pain. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins