Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Insomnia Often Appears To Be A Persistent Condition

Date:
March 9, 2009
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
About three-fourths of individuals with insomnia report experiencing the condition for at least one year and almost half experience it for three years, according to a new report.

About three-fourths of individuals with insomnia report experiencing the condition for at least one year and almost half experience it for three years, according to a new report .

Insomnia is the inability to fall asleep or stay asleep. "Approximately 30 percent of adults report symptoms of insomnia and 6 percent to 10 percent meet diagnostic criteria for an insomnia disorder," the authors write as background information in the article. Several factors such as being female, increasing age, having anxiety or depression and experiencing pain from medical conditions have been associated with insomnia. The condition has been linked to higher health care costs, work absenteeism, disability and higher risk of hypertension and depression.

Charles M. Morin, Ph.D., of Université Laval and Centre de recherche Université Laval—Robert Giffard, Québec, Canada, and colleagues evaluated insomnia persistence, remission and relapse in 388 adults (average age 44.8) over a course of three years. Individuals with an insomnia syndrome (insomnia symptoms at least three nights per week for at least one month causing substantial distress or daytime impairment) at the beginning of the study (n=119) were compared to those with insomnia symptoms (n=269) to examine the course of initial severe sleep difficulties.

"Of the study sample, 74 percent reported insomnia for at least one year and 46 percent reported insomnia persisting over the entire three-year study," the authors write. The group with initial insomnia syndrome had a higher persistence rate than the group with symptoms of insomnia (66.1 percent vs. 37.2 percent), respectively. About fifty-four percent of participants went into insomnia remission; however, 26.7 percent of them eventually experienced relapse. "Individuals with subsyndromal insomnia [insomnia symptoms] at baseline were three times more likely to remit than worsen to syndrome status, although persistence was the most frequent course in that group as well," the authors note.

Of the 269 individuals with baseline symptoms of insomnia, after one year 38.4 percent were classified as good sleepers, 48.7 percent still had insomnia symptoms and 12.9 percent had insomnia syndrome. Results were similar after the second and third year of follow-up. Of the 119 participants with insomnia syndrome at the beginning of the study, 17 percent were good sleepers after one year, while 37 percent had symptoms of insomnia and 46 percent remained in the insomnia syndrome group.

"This study provides preliminary evidence to better understand the natural course of insomnia. Additional studies are needed, however, to identify moderating and mediating factors of persistence, remission and relapse," the authors conclude. "Improved understanding of the long-term course of persistent insomnia would be helpful to guide the development of effective public health prevention and intervention programs to avert long-term negative outcomes."

This study was supported by a grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Morin et al. The Natural History of Insomnia: A Population-Based 3-Year Longitudinal Study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 2009; 169 (5): 447 DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2008.610

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Insomnia Often Appears To Be A Persistent Condition." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090309162005.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2009, March 9). Insomnia Often Appears To Be A Persistent Condition. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090309162005.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Insomnia Often Appears To Be A Persistent Condition." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090309162005.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) — A new study found couples who had at least 150 guests at their weddings were more likely to report being happy in their marriages. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

AP (Aug. 20, 2014) — Nine years after Hurricane Katrina, charter schools are the new reality of public education in New Orleans. The state of Louisiana took over most of the city's public schools after the killer storm in 2005. (Aug. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) — Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins