Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Blink Often To Avoid Computer-related Eye Woes

Date:
March 11, 2009
Source:
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Summary:
Blink frequently while sitting in front of your monitor to reduce the risk of dry eyes from prolonged computer use, said an optometrist.

Blink frequently while sitting in front of your monitor to reduce the risk of dry eyes from prolonged computer use, said an optometrist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

Related Articles


“Many work in front of a computer all day and this can leave vision vulnerable to problems like dry eyes, eyestrain and other problems that may signal computer vision syndrome,” said Keshia Sims Elder, assistant professor in the UAB School of Optometry. “Blinking keeps the front surface of the eye moist.”

There are other ways to protect sight and avoid computer vision syndrome, Elder said. In addition to blinking, computer users should:

  • Have a regular comprehensive eye exam to ensure healthy eyes and correct eyeglass or contact-lens strength. “Be certain to tell your optometrist about the computer work you do,” Elder said.
  • Rest your eyes and look away from the computer for 20 seconds occasionally. “Try this quick time-out for your eyes every 20 minutes or so,” she said.
  • Use a humidifier at home to boost eye moisture.
  • Wear glasses that are specifically designed to function comfortably at the computer. “Special glasses and computer screen filters are available to help reduce glare and discomfort,” Elder said.

Pre-existing, uncorrected vision problems like farsightedness, astigmatism and age-related eye conditions may also contribute to computer vision syndrome.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alabama at Birmingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Blink Often To Avoid Computer-related Eye Woes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090311181401.htm>.
University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2009, March 11). Blink Often To Avoid Computer-related Eye Woes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090311181401.htm
University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Blink Often To Avoid Computer-related Eye Woes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090311181401.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Samsung's Incredible Shrinking Smartphone Profits

Samsung's Incredible Shrinking Smartphone Profits

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 30, 2014) The world's top mobile maker is under severe pressure, delivering a 60 percent drop in Q3 profit as its handset business struggles. Turning it around may not prove easy, says Reuters' Jon Gordon. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ban On Wearable Cameras In Movie Theaters Surprises No One

Ban On Wearable Cameras In Movie Theaters Surprises No One

Newsy (Oct. 30, 2014) The Motion Picture Association of America and the National Association of Theatre Owners now prohibit wearable cameras such as Google Glass. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Microsoft Launches Fitness Band After Accidental Reveal

Microsoft Launches Fitness Band After Accidental Reveal

Newsy (Oct. 30, 2014) Microsoft accidentally revealed its upcoming fitness band on Wednesday, so the company went ahead and announced it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins