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At Risk For Kidney Disease? Check Your Genes

Date:
April 19, 2009
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
Genetic differences can influence one's risk of developing proteinuria, a condition that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease, according to a new study. The results may be important for determining patients' health risks and for devising new medical treatments.

Genetic differences can influence one's risk of developing proteinuria, a condition that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a new study. The results may be important for determining patients' health risks and for devising new medical treatments.

Approximately 12% of people in the United States have proteinuria (abnormal levels of protein lost in the urine), and African Americans and American Indians have higher risks of developing the condition than other groups. Researchers suspect that genetic variation likely accounts for part of their increased risks.

Amy Mottl, MD (University of North Carolina Kidney Center), and her colleagues looked to see if they could identify the genetic causes of American Indians' increased risk for proteinuria. They studied approximately 3,500 individuals from 13 American Indian tribes enrolled in the Strong Heart Family Study funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The investigators found multiple chromosomal regions that may possess genes that influence variation in proteinuria, especially in the setting of diabetes or hypertension.

The study's findings are preliminary and additional research is needed to determine which genes influence one's proteinuria risk. "Further exploration of the candidate genes underlying the chromosomes implicated in our study is warranted," the authors wrote. This could lead to a better understanding of how proteinuria arises and to the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment.

While this study focused on American Indians, its findings likely apply to the general population as well, where the prevalence of proteinuria is rising.

The authors report no financial disclosures.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Linkage Analysis of Albuminuria. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, April 15, 2009 DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2008080895

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "At Risk For Kidney Disease? Check Your Genes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090415172233.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2009, April 19). At Risk For Kidney Disease? Check Your Genes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 15, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090415172233.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "At Risk For Kidney Disease? Check Your Genes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090415172233.htm (accessed September 15, 2014).

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