Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Online Reporting System Could Track Surgical Complications

Date:
April 22, 2009
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
A Web-based reporting system may help clinicians track surgical complications and detect patterns of adverse events, identifying opportunities to improve the quality of care, according to a new article.

A Web-based reporting system may help clinicians track surgical complications and detect patterns of adverse events, identifying opportunities to improve the quality of care, according to a new article.

Related Articles


Complications and deaths during surgery are typically discussed by clinicians at a weekly surgical morbidity and mortality conference, according to background information in the article. "Individual cases are typically presented by a resident, and a discussion ensues addressing the issues in that single case," the authors write. "Recent efforts have attempted to make the discussion more evidence-based and less blame-oriented. However, the focus has remained on individual cases, residents and physicians rather than on the system and overall quality of patient care."

In addition, the morbidity and mortality conference typically does not address near-misses, events that had the potential to result in an adverse outcome and can offer valuable learning opportunities. Karl Y. Bilimoria, M.D., M.S., of Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago and colleagues designed a Web-based system to track adverse and near-miss events and also established an automated method to identify patterns of these events. The system was implemented at a large metropolitan tertiary care center in September 2005. Residents entered data about adverse events used for the morbidity and mortality conference, and all clinicians in the surgery department were given a password to anonymously enter information about other adverse events and near misses.

Through August 2007, 15,524 surgical patients were reported including 957 (6.2 percent) adverse events and 34 (0.2 percent) anonymous reports. "The automated pattern recognition system helped identify four event patterns from morbidity and mortality reports and three patterns from anonymous/near-miss reporting," the authors write. "After multidisciplinary meetings and expert reviews, the patterns were addressed with educational initiatives, correction of systems issues and/or intensive quality monitoring." For instance, recurring errors in chest tube placements and nurse-to-physician communications were detected and managed.

The events entered into the online system also were compared with hospital databases to assess the completeness of reporting. Only 27.2 percent (264 of 970) of readmissions and 41.6 percent (89 of 214) of inpatient deaths were reported into the system; there was no change in monthly adverse reporting rate when the online system was initiated. "Though not surprising, this under-reporting was disappointing," the authors write. "During the study period, interventions aimed at increasing reporting had little effect." A presentation from the department chair regarding what constitutes an adverse event and the importance of tracking complications produced an initial spike in reporting that was short-lived.

"An electronic physician-reported event tracking system should be incorporated into all surgery departments irrespective of whether the department is associated with a residency program; however, this is just one component of what should be a larger quality improvement effort," the authors conclude. "An online event tracking system is a feasible, promising and potentially powerful initiative to improve surgical safety in the United States."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Karl Y. Bilimoria, MD, MS; Thomas E. Kmiecik, PhD; Debra A. DaRosa, PhD; Amy Halverson, MD; Mark K. Eskandari, MD; Richard H. Bell Jr, MD; Nathaniel J. Soper, MD; Jeffrey D. Wayne, MD. Development of an Online Morbidity, Mortality, and Near-Miss Reporting System to Identify Patterns of Adverse Events in Surgical Patients. Arch Surg., 2009;144(4):305-311 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Online Reporting System Could Track Surgical Complications." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090420170806.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2009, April 22). Online Reporting System Could Track Surgical Complications. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090420170806.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Online Reporting System Could Track Surgical Complications." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090420170806.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Google X wants to improve modern medicine with nanoparticles and a wearable device. It's all an attempt to tackle disease detection and prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Drinking Milk Lead To Early Death?

Can Drinking Milk Lead To Early Death?

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Researchers in Sweden released a study showing heavy milk drinkers face an increased mortality risk from a variety of causes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Surrounded by health care workers in the White House East Room, President Barack Obama said the U.S. will likely see additional Ebola cases in the weeks ahead. But he said the nation can't seal itself off in the fight against the disease. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins