Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

African-American Women With Advanced Breast Cancer Often Forego Vital Treatment

Date:
May 22, 2009
Source:
American Cancer Society
Summary:
A new study finds that nearly one in four African-American women with late stage breast cancer refused chemotherapy and radiation therapy, potentially life saving therapies.

A new study finds that nearly one in four African American women with late stage breast cancer refused chemotherapy and radiation therapy, potentially life saving therapies. Published in the July 1, 2009 issue of Cancer, the study indicates that more efforts are needed to ensure that all women with breast cancer receive appropriate care.

Related Articles


In the United States, African American women have almost twice the rate of advanced (stage III) breast cancer than white women. To get a better sense of the tumor characteristics and medical care of these patients, researchers led by Monica Rizzo, M.D., of the Emory University School of Medicine and Emory University's Avon Comprehensive Breast Cancer Center at Grady reviewed stage III breast cancer data from 2000 to 2006 from an inner city hospital in Atlanta that serves a large African American population.

The investigators identified 107 cases of stage III breast cancers diagnosed and/or treated at this hospital over the six years of study. Approximately 87 percent of these cases were in African American women. Triple negative tumors accounted for 29 percent of the cases. These cancers do not express the estrogen receptor, the progesterone receptor or the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and therefore do not respond well to therapies that target these proteins (such as trastuzumab, or Herceptin, which blocks HER2).

Chemotherapy and radiation are recommended therapies for patients with stage III breast cancer; however many women in this study decided to forego these treatments. The study found 20.5 percent of patients with stage III breast cancer refused chemotherapy, and 26.3 percent who should have received chest radiation refused. There was no difference in marital status, religious background, or age of the patients who refused either chemotherapy or radiation compared with the patients who received recommended care.

The authors say the reasons why African American women with advanced breast cancer often refuse necessary care are unclear. They could include socioeconomic and demographic factors, cultural beliefs, healthcare access, additional illnesses, and patient choice. Additional studies are needed to better define which factors play a role.

To dispel fears of cancer treatment and encourage compliance with recommended therapies, the study investigators have implemented a community outreach program at their institution. The program includes a nurse practitioner and a social worker who carefully follow all patients during and after their cancer treatments. "The high rate of refusal for important life saving therapies that we identified needs further study after implementation of our planned initiatives, so all women are offered and will receive appropriate care based on stage of diagnosis," the authors wrote.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Cancer Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Monica Rizzo, Mary Jo Lund, Marina Mosunjac, Harvey Bumpers, Leslie Holmes, Ruth O' Regan, Otis W. Brawley, and Sheryl Gabram. Characteristics and treatment modalities for African American Women diagnosed with Stage III breast cancer. Cancer, Online: May 22, 2009; July 1, 2009 DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24334

Cite This Page:

American Cancer Society. "African-American Women With Advanced Breast Cancer Often Forego Vital Treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090522081210.htm>.
American Cancer Society. (2009, May 22). African-American Women With Advanced Breast Cancer Often Forego Vital Treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090522081210.htm
American Cancer Society. "African-American Women With Advanced Breast Cancer Often Forego Vital Treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090522081210.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins