Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Ruptured Brain Aneurysms: Minimally Invasive Stroke Treatment Produces Better Patient Outcomes Than Surgical Operation, Study Finds

Date:
June 3, 2009
Source:
University of Minnesota
Summary:
While minimally invasive coil treatments for those with a ruptured brain aneurysm have proved to be a more effective technique than traditional surgical operation in selected patients, the superior procedure is drastically more expensive, according to new research.

While minimally invasive coil treatments for those with a ruptured brain aneurysm have proved to be a more effective technique than traditional surgical operation in selected patients, the superior procedure is drastically more expensive, according to new research from the Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Research Center at University of Minnesota Medical School.

Related Articles


Using outcomes from more than 2,000 patients – half of whom underwent minimally invasive endovascular coiling for brain aneurysms – and economic data gathered from a variety of hospitals throughout the United States, it is clear the minimally invasive procedure has better patient outcomes – including qualify of life – than the neurosurgical counterpart.

Minimally invasive treatments on average cost about $72,000 more than surgical treatments for each quality-adjusted life years gained (including costs stemming from disability, hospitalization, retreatment, and rebleeding) – partly because multiple follow-up treatments are necessary within the first year of endovascular treatments, as opposed to one major surgical operation.

Coiling is a technique that involves placing a small catheter into the aneurysm and filling it with platinum coils. The catheter is introduced through a blood vessel in the groin and advanced under X-ray all the way into the brain blood vessels.

With accrual of additional years with better outcome status, the cost-effectiveness of endovascular coiling would most likely progressively improve and eventually reverse direction, said Alberto Maud, M.D., principal investigator of the study.

"The minimally invasive treatment is better tolerated in selected critically ill patients with ruptured brain aneurysms. The procedure is effective in preventing a second rupture but currently limited in terms of cost due to the need for additional follow-up procedures to treat new aneurysm growth," Maud said. "However, a new generation of devices promises to provide more permanent obliterations for aneurysms. It should be noted that despite additional treatments, patients treated with endovascular treatment continued have lower rates of death and disability than those treated with open surgery."

The research is published in the May issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

Other benefits of minimally invasive surgery include less time in hospital and lower chance of disability, said Adnan I. Qureshi, M.D., senior investigator of the study, who is also the director of the Minnesota Stroke Initiative. Currently about 30 to 40 percent of all patients with aneurysms are treated with minimally invasive procedures, he said.

Intracranial aneurysms impact about 2 percent of the general population worldwide and are present in 10 million people in the United States. Until recently, the predominant treatment was open operation. However, endovascular treatments have increased as the technique has improved.

Other investigators included Drs. Lakshminarayan, Suri, Vazquez, and Lanzino. The study was funded by Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Research Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Minnesota. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Maud et al. Cost-effectiveness analysis of endovascular versus neurosurgical treatment for ruptured intracranial aneurysms in the United States. Journal of Neurosurgery, 2009; 110 (5): 880 DOI: 10.3171/2008.8.JNS0858

Cite This Page:

University of Minnesota. "Ruptured Brain Aneurysms: Minimally Invasive Stroke Treatment Produces Better Patient Outcomes Than Surgical Operation, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090529132123.htm>.
University of Minnesota. (2009, June 3). Ruptured Brain Aneurysms: Minimally Invasive Stroke Treatment Produces Better Patient Outcomes Than Surgical Operation, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090529132123.htm
University of Minnesota. "Ruptured Brain Aneurysms: Minimally Invasive Stroke Treatment Produces Better Patient Outcomes Than Surgical Operation, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090529132123.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins