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Heavy Women Have Lower Quality Relationships, But Same Is Not True For Men, Study Finds

Date:
June 23, 2009
Source:
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Summary:
Associations between body mass index (BMI) and relationship quality and other partner/relationship perceptions were investigated in 57 couples in New Zealand. Heavier women had lower quality relationships, which they predicted were more likely to end. They partnered with less desirable men and thought their partners would rate them as less warm/trustworthy.
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Dr. Janet D. Latner, an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, has co-authored an article about the weight of women and men and the quality of their romantic relationships.

The research—conducted jointly by Professor Latner and New Zealand clinical psychologist Dr. Alice D. Boyes addresses body image, weight, romantic relationships, and differences between men and women.

Associations between body mass index (BMI) and relationship quality and other partner/relationship perceptions were investigated in 57 couples in New Zealand. Heavier women had lower quality relationships, which they predicted were more likely to end. They partnered with less desirable men and thought their partners would rate them as less warm/trustworthy.

The male partners of heavier women judged the women's bodies less positively and men rated heavier women as poorer matches to their ideal partners for attractiveness/vitality. In contrast, men's BMIs were generally not associated with relationship functioning. These findings point to the potential mechanisms that may contribute to heavier women's relationship difficulties.

"Prejudice and discrimination are commonly directed at overweight individuals. However, few previous studies have examined whether weight stigma occurs within established romantic relationships. Our results suggest it does," said Dr. Latner.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Weight Stigma in Existing Relationships. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, July 2009

Cite This Page:

University of Hawaii at Manoa. "Heavy Women Have Lower Quality Relationships, But Same Is Not True For Men, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090623091125.htm>.
University of Hawaii at Manoa. (2009, June 23). Heavy Women Have Lower Quality Relationships, But Same Is Not True For Men, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090623091125.htm
University of Hawaii at Manoa. "Heavy Women Have Lower Quality Relationships, But Same Is Not True For Men, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090623091125.htm (accessed July 30, 2015).

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