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Women More Accurate At Hammering A Nail Than Men In Good Light

Date:
July 6, 2009
Source:
Society for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Scientists are studying hammering ability as a model for difficult motor tasks. The results indicate that there is a surprising difference in performance between the sexes, and that this difference is dependent in turn on the hammering conditions.

The experimental setup.
Credit: Duncan Irschick

When it comes to something as simple as hammering a nail, some people are naturals and get the job done after a few clean, sharp strokes of the hammer, whereas for the rest of us a similar challenge is likely to end up with the nail bent in the middle, a sore thumb and a wounded pride.

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Dr. Duncan Irschick and his colleagues at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst have measured hammering performance in men and women and found that men are more accurate than women when hammering under light deprivation, and, conversely, women are more accurate in the light, regardless of target size.

"We believe that our research indicates that humans have remarkable compensatory ability during difficult motor tasks such as hammering in the dark", says Dr Irschick, who in future studies is planning to focus on understanding how hammering ability evolves in humans from early development to adulthood. Dr Irschick will present his findings at the Society of Experimental Biology Annual Meeting in Glasgow on the 28th June 2009.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Experimental Biology. "Women More Accurate At Hammering A Nail Than Men In Good Light." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 July 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090628085919.htm>.
Society for Experimental Biology. (2009, July 6). Women More Accurate At Hammering A Nail Than Men In Good Light. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090628085919.htm
Society for Experimental Biology. "Women More Accurate At Hammering A Nail Than Men In Good Light." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090628085919.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

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