Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Minority Students Earned Greater Number Of Academic Degrees In Fiscal Year 2006

Date:
November 4, 2009
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
A new National Science Foundation report shows an increase in the number of academic degrees awarded to minority students since 2004, the last time such data were published.

A new National Science Foundation report shows an increase in the number of academic degrees awarded to minority students since 2004, the last time such data were published.

Related Articles


The report, Science and Engineering Degrees by Race/Ethnicity: 1997-2006, developed by the Science Resources Statistics division of NSF's Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences directorate shows more degrees awarded to minorities in nearly all categories.

Among U.S. citizens and permanent residents who earned bachelor's degrees from fiscal year 2004 to 2006, Asians showed the largest rate of increase--10.5 percent. American Indian/Alaska Natives showed the smallest at 1.3 percent.

Master's degree recipients also included increased numbers of minority awardees.The number of Hispanics receiving master's degrees grew by 13.1 percent, while the number of blacks grew by a similar amount--13 percent. White students showed the smallest growth rate at 5.9 percent.

Although American Indian/Native American and black students showed increases in terms of bachelor's and master's degrees awarded, these groups showed sharp declines relative to doctoral degrees, falling off by 9.1 and 9.8 percent respectively. The number of Asian, Hispanic and white doctorate recipients increased by 15.8, 16.1 and 2.5 percent respectively.

Data from the report also show a 3.9 percent increase in awarded S&E bachelor's degrees, a 1.6 percent increase in master's degrees and a 13.6 percent increase in doctoral degrees. Results for degrees awarded in non-S&E fields were mixed. The number of bachelor's degrees in these fields grew by 5.2 percent and master's degree awards grew by 6.5 percent. But doctoral degrees in non-S&E fields declined by 0.7 percent during the same period.

Several fields of study saw growth from fiscal year 2004 to 2006 such as physical sciences and health fields, which were popular among bachelor's degree students. For master's degree students, mathematical sciences, biological sciences, and health fields showed the largest rates of increase. Mechanical engineering showed a 34.7 percent increase among doctoral students.

Overall, computer sciences made the largest gains among doctoral students at 53.2 percent, but the field also showed the steepest decline among bachelor's and master's degree students, falling 24.6 percent and 16.4 percent respectively. The steepest decline for doctoral students was in education doctorates, which fell by 7.7 percent.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Minority Students Earned Greater Number Of Academic Degrees In Fiscal Year 2006." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 November 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091104161839.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (2009, November 4). Minority Students Earned Greater Number Of Academic Degrees In Fiscal Year 2006. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091104161839.htm
National Science Foundation. "Minority Students Earned Greater Number Of Academic Degrees In Fiscal Year 2006." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091104161839.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Science & Society News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

After Sony Hack, What's Next?

After Sony Hack, What's Next?

Reuters - US Online Video (Dec. 19, 2014) The hacking attack on Sony Pictures has U.S. government officials weighing their response to the cyber-attack. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Spokesman: 'NORAD Ready to Track Santa'

Spokesman: 'NORAD Ready to Track Santa'

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said that NORAD is ready to track Santa Claus as he delivers gifts next week. Speaking tongue-in-cheek, he said if Santa drops anything off his sleigh, "we've got destroyers out there to pick them up." (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) The U.S. Navy unveils an underwater device that mimics the movement of a fish. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins