Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Keeping Hearts Pumping With 'LifeFlow': Smart IV Device To Save Lives At Disaster Sites

Date:
November 6, 2009
Source:
American Friends of Tel Aviv University
Summary:
LifeFlow is a new device that applies a sophisticated algorithm to a computer-controlled IV drip to improve the efficiency of disaster response in the field.

When paramedics rush to the scene of a multi-car pileup or a terror attack, their first task is to assess who needs immediate care. But blood hemorrhaging can obscure damage, and the gruesome mess means paramedics can't always determine who should be treated first.

Tel Aviv University's new LifeFlow device, currently in development, could become the paramedic's new best friend -- and save many lives in the process. The technology is based on a highly sophisticated mathematical algorithm which, when applied to a computer-controlled intravenous (IV) drip, can accurately assess what percentage of a person's blood stores are left. The device then administers the proper amount and type of IV fluid, permitting the paramedic to move on to the next disaster victim with fewer worries -- and more confidence that the first victim will remain stable before arriving at the emergency room.

"It's practically impossible for a well-trained paramedic to assess an individual's loss of blood, especially at a scene where there are already mass casualties," says Prof. Ofer Barnea of TAU's Department of Biomedical Engineering. "When paramedics approach a disaster scene, they have little to no idea how much blood a person has lost. They check a pulse to see if it's weak or strong, and tend to administer fluids automatically when there is any blood loss. But this can be a big medical mistake, since fluid overload can have a grave outcome."

Made-to-measure IVs

An automatic one-size-fits-all intravenous infusion of liquids for severe blood loss is not always the best way to proceed, he says. When a person's blood reserves are meager, the infusion can dilute the blood, reducing its oxygen-carrying capacity. Blood pressure rises from the IV, the heart starts to pump harder, and infusion-induced oxygen deficit can ensue -- resulting in a preventable fatality.

And it's not only important for the paramedic to know how much fluid to administer, stresses Prof. Barnea. "It's important to have a device that can determine the kind of fluid needed for a wounded body. A patient could need either a crystalloid IV or a colloid IV to combat the loss of blood. Our device will make this determination automatically," he says.

Other drugs, such as painkillers, could be added to the LifeFlow device as well. "Our final goal is to develop a device that controls the amount, rate and type of infusion fluid by measuring a number of different parameters."

So far the system has been validated in tests with pigs, and Prof. Barnea's team is working to take LifeFlow to the next level of development in conjunction with the Israel Defense Force's Medical Corps and a grant from the Israeli Ministry of Health. The team is currently planning new animal experiments and hopes LifeFlow can be ready for field deployment within the next few years if investment goals are met. It is being licensed by TAU's technology transfer arm, Ramot (www.ramot.org).

"It's a solution that's good for any American city threatened by terror. It's good for remote medical clinics in Alaska. It's good for soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan, and it's good for hospitals in developing nations," says Prof. Barnea, "especially when you have to take care of a lot of wounded people at once."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Friends of Tel Aviv University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Friends of Tel Aviv University. "Keeping Hearts Pumping With 'LifeFlow': Smart IV Device To Save Lives At Disaster Sites." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 November 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105132500.htm>.
American Friends of Tel Aviv University. (2009, November 6). Keeping Hearts Pumping With 'LifeFlow': Smart IV Device To Save Lives At Disaster Sites. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105132500.htm
American Friends of Tel Aviv University. "Keeping Hearts Pumping With 'LifeFlow': Smart IV Device To Save Lives At Disaster Sites." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105132500.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Beijing Marathon Runners Brave Hazardous Air Pollution

Beijing Marathon Runners Brave Hazardous Air Pollution

AFP (Oct. 19, 2014) Tens of thousands of runners battled thick smog at the Beijing Marathon on Sunday, with some donning masks as the levels of PM2.5 small pollutant particles soared to 16 times the maximum recommended level. Duration: 00:54 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins