Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Rising mortality in lower income people with diabetes despite drop in overall rate

Date:
December 21, 2009
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
While mortality from diabetes has declined in Canada, the income-related mortality gap is increasing, with lower income groups faring worse than higher income groups, according to a new study.

While mortality from diabetes has declined in Canada, the income-related mortality gap is increasing, with lower income groups faring worse than higher income groups, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Globally, diabetes is associated with a two-fold increase in mortality, with most of those deaths due to cardiovascular issues. Survival for people with diabetes has improved over the last 10 years, partly because of better diabetes care and a reduction in cardiovascular events.

The study looked at data from Ontario, Canada from 1995 to 2006. The number of Ontarians aged 30 years or older with diabetes rose 130% while the non diabetes population in Ontario rose 17% over the same period. Death rates were significantly higher in men than in women and in people aged 65 and older compared with younger people.

Age- and sex-standardized mortality fell by 33% across all income groups but the higher income groups experienced a larger decline in mortality than the lowest income group (36% versus 31%). In people aged 30-64 years, there was a more than 40% widening in the rate ratio (from 1.1 to 1.6) between the poorest versus the richest group.

"Our findings suggest that improvements in diabetes outcomes may be lagging in the poorer segments of the diabetic population," write Dr. Lorraine Lipscombe of Women's College Hospital in Toronto and coauthors.

They suggest several reasons for these findings. Increasing costs of medications may be limiting access and compromising care for people who cannot afford medications. In people aged 65 and over, income had a much smaller effect on mortality as drug costs are subsidized for this age group. Lower health literacy in poorer patients may be hindering their ability to follow complicated medical routines.

Changing demographics in Ontario, especially due to immigration, may also be a factor. Between 1996 and 2006, 37% of immigrants were South Asian, a group susceptible to diabetes and cardiovascular complications. New immigrants often have lower incomes than more established residents.

"Our study highlights the urgent need to address barriers to adequate diabetes care in low-income populations, to stem the rising burden of diabetes among poorer people," state the authors.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Rising mortality in lower income people with diabetes despite drop in overall rate." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091221123313.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2009, December 21). Rising mortality in lower income people with diabetes despite drop in overall rate. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091221123313.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Rising mortality in lower income people with diabetes despite drop in overall rate." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091221123313.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins